New study essentially shows that you’re better off giving your children beer when thirsty as drinks marketed at them that, which are presumably healthy are far from it. C’mon on, it’s not as if they drive.

Fruit Juices Marketed At Children Have Staggering Sugar Levels

Fruit Juices with way too much sugar

In a study published on Thursday in the online journal BMJ Open, researchers were shocked to report that many drinks aimed at children provide a full day’s worth of sugar in a single serving.

The study was led by Simon Capewell, a professor at the Institute of Psychology, Health and Society at the University of Liverpool along with others and looked into a handful over 200 drinks aimed at children. Others contacted on the other side of the pond were hardly surprised with the findings.

There seems to be a shut-off that companies wouldn’t make highly addictive drinks to be consumed by those of a young age.

“I believe the results would be very similar if this study was conducted with fruit drink products available in the United States,” said Pamela Koch, executive director of the nutrition program at Teachers College, Columbia University, in New York City.

“Many fruit drinks are excessively high in added sugars, as this study found. Yet, these are often marketed as healthful products, confusing parents and children,” she said.

The team didn’t, per se, look at natural sugars but rather “free” sugars like glucose, fructose, sucrose and just sugar out of a bag that manufacturers add in absurd quantities.

We’re talking about a staggering about of sugar with levels reaching a full day’s worth of sugar in a single serving in nearly half of the “products” tested.

“Unfortunately, our research shows that these parents have been misled,” said Capwell. “The sugar content of the fruit drinks, including natural fruit juices and smoothies tested, is unacceptably high. And smoothies are among the worst offenders.”

Suffice is to say parent should really consider a glass of water paired with, well, actual fruit.

“Manufacturers should stop adding unnecessary amounts of sugars, and therefore calories, to their fruit drink/juice/smoothie products,” Capewell said.

Actual fruit juice makers in an uproar

When you see studies like these the temptation as a parent is to cut out all fruit juices rather than taking the time to investigate on your own.

But frankly, many won’t.

“Parents should feel good about serving 100 percent juice to their children in appropriate amounts as a body of research shows drinking 100% juice is not associated with dental [cavities] in early childhood and in fact, some studies show greater frequency of juice drinking may even have a protective effect on dental health in children,” the U.S.-based Juice Products Association said in a statement that represented over 50 juice makers.

“Weight is also not an issue, as a systematic scientific review of the evidence found drinking appropriate amounts of 100 percent juice is not associated with weight status or obesity in children,” the group said.

“The 2015 U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommends limiting added sugars to less than 10 percent of children’s total calories and promotes eating fruit, rather than drinking 100 percent juice, to meet the suggested daily servings of fruits and vegetables,” said Nancy Copperman, a nutritionist from N.Y. when contacted by UPI.

However, and quite simply, parents don’t seem to have the time.

The paper came with an uproar in the U.K with lawmakers promising fines and punishments for companies responsible.