I am one of over 290,000 people who subscribe to Eric Barker’s weekly blog newsletter, “Barking Up the Wrong Tree: The Surprising Science Behind Why Everything You Know About Success Is (Mostly) Wrong.” Now, in a book of the same name (HarperCollins, 2017), he tackles the question of life success—what is it and what produces it? Through multiple anecdotes, all illustrative of the fruits of solid scientific research (he has nearly 50 pages of endnotes), Barker takes us on an often strange, counterintuitive journey.

Along the way we learn curious facts about prison gangs, pirates, even Moldovans. We discover that, despite the many significant advantages of optimism—a longer life, for instance—depressed people (and “depression is pessimism writ large”) are better at making predictions. We learn how to turn something that’s boring or overwhelming into a game that’s winnable, has novel challenges and goals, and provides feedback. We are told to “use trying and quitting as a deliberate strategy to find out what is worth not quitting” and then to set aside a small percentage of time for “little experiments” to keep learning and growing. And, oh yes, eminent scientists have traditionally had a lot of hobbies. “Getting lots of different ideas crashing together turns out to be one of the keys to creativity.”

We all need role models. Barker offers us one: a Toronto raccoon. “Their ability to get into trash cans shows a level of grit and resourcefulness that is almost beyond compare.” In 2002 Toronto financed the development of “raccoon-proof” trash cans. “How well did they work? Well, let’s just say that in 2015 the city spent an additional $31 million dollars to create a new, redesigned ‘raccoon-proof’ trash can. Not a good sign, folks.”

Barker’s book is a first-rate read—illuminating, humorous, and compassionate. (“Self-compassion beats self-esteem.”) It’s by turns empowering and humbling. Sounds like life, doesn’t it?

Barking Up the Wrong Tree