What’s Warren Buffett’s Secret To Great Writing?

What’s Warren Buffett’s Secret To Great Writing? by Lawrence Cunningham

As directors increasingly ponder writing letters to shareholders, many turn to the gold standard. They wonder what most distinguishes Warren Buffett’s annual missive to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders. Clarity, wit and rationality are hallmarks to emulate, along with how Buffett personally pens lengthy sections to read more as literary essays than corporate communications.

But these attractive qualities are products of a deeper distinction with greatest value. Every Buffett communiqué has a particular motivation: to attract shareholders and colleagues—including sellers of businesses—who endorse his unique philosophy. Tenets include fundamental business analysis, old-fashioned valuation methods, and a long time horizon.

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A recurring motif of Buffett’s writing is the classic rhetorical practice of disagreement. Buffett recites conventional wisdom along with multiple reasons why it is inaccurate or incomplete. He then differentiates Berkshire with themes like autonomy, permanence, and trust.

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In a new article (available free here), parsing recent examples shows that Warren Buffett’s dispatches often work on several levels simultaneously. Think of circles on a dartboard, with the bull’s-eye as Berkshire’s distinctive practices, which Buffett relentlessly explains. Surrounding that core explication, in concentric circles, Buffett lauds specific Berkshire businesses or personnel, contrasts their industry or competitors, and opines on related public policy debates.

By arguing in this artful manner, Buffett hones Berkshire’s corporate culture while answering rivals and critics alike. Leaving an unmistakable effect on the conglomerate’s millions of owners, managers, and employees, Buffett’s essays are a model of tone-at-the-top governance. Read more here.

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Warren Buffett chose Lawrence Cunningham in 1996 to compile his famous shareholder letters into the book, The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America, now in its 4th edition and sold worldwide in a dozen languages.

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Larry is a professor of law at the George Washington University Law School. He joined the GW Law School faculty in 2007, having previously taught for 6 years at Boston College (where he served a 2-year term as Academic Dean) and for 8 years at Cardozo (where he served a 5-year term as Director of the Heyman Center on Corporate Governance). He also taught courses at many other schools in the US and abroad, including Central European University, Columbia University, Hebrew University, University of Navarra, and Vanderbilt University. Before entering academia, he practiced corporate law for 4 years at Cravath, Swaine & Moore. He earned his BA from University of Delaware and his JD magna cum laude from Cardozo. Larry writes extensively in corporate and securities law, with a special emphasis on law and accounting and investor perspectives. He teaches courses in those fields as well as Contracts. He has published a dozen books and 50 law review articles. His recent books include: Contracts in the Real World: Stories of Popular Contracts and Why They Matter (Cambridge University Press 2012), The AIG Story (Wiley 2013), The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America (Carolina Academic Press 2013), and Berkshire Hathaway’s Value of Values (Columbia University Press 2014). Areas of Interest: Accounting, Auditing, Contracts, Corporate Law, Finance, Investing, Legal Education, Securities Regulation