Inefficient Markets: An Introduction to Behavioral Finance

Inefficient Markets: An Introduction to Behavioral Finance (Clarendon Lectures in Economics) by Andrei Shleifer

Inefficient Markets: An Introduction to Behavioral Finance – Description

The efficient markets hypothesis has been the central proposition in finance for nearly thirty years. It states that securities prices in financial markets must equal fundamental values, either because all investors are rational or because arbitrage eliminates pricing anomalies. Inefficient Markets: An Introduction to Behavioral Finance describes an alternative approach to the study of financial markets: behavioral finance. This approach starts with an observation that the assumptions of investor rationality and perfect arbitrage are overwhelmingly contradicted by both psychological and institutional evidence. In actual financial markets, less than fully rational investors trade against arbitrageurs whose resources are limited by risk aversion, short horizons, and agency problems. Inefficient Markets: An Introduction to Behavioral Finance presents models of such markets. These models explain the available financial data more accurately than the efficient markets hypothesis, and generate new predictions about security prices.

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Housing MarketThe Voss Value Fund was up 4.09% net for the second quarter, while the Voss Value Offshore Fund was up 3.93%. The Russell 2000 returned 25.42%, the Russell 2000 Value returned 18.24%, and the S&P 500 gained 20.54%. In July, the funds did much better with a return of 15.25% for the Voss Value Fund Read More


Inefficient Markets: An Introduction to Behavioral Finance

Inefficient Markets: An Introduction to Behavioral Finance – Editorial Reviews

“An excellent academic discussion of [stock mispricing] and other behavioral influences in the stock market.”–Jeff Madrick, New York Review of Books

“The only advanced undergraduate or graduate text available on the subject.”–Jeffrey Wurgler, Yale School of Management

About the Author

Andrei Shleifer is professor of Economics at Harvard University.

Inefficient Markets: An Introduction to Behavioral Finance