Survey Shows Rebound In Job Market Confidence In The U.S.

0
Survey Shows Rebound In Job Market Confidence In The U.S.

Job market confidence is at the highest level it has been since the beginning of the recession, according to a new survey. The 2012 General Social Survey shows that Americans now feel they would be able to find a new job if they needed to. In addition, it shows that worries about losing jobs have quieted down, falling to their peak in 2010 to about the average level of the past 35 years.

Survey Shows Rebound In Job Market Confidence In The U.S.

CNBC reports that last year, 54 percent of Americans said it would be either somewhat or very easy to find a job if they lost their current job. That’s compared to 46 percent in 2010, which was the lowest percentage recorded since 1983 when the nation was also recovering from a major recession. The average percentage over the last 35 years has been 58 percent.

Despite 60% Loss On Shorts, Yarra Square Up 20% In 2020

Yarra Square Investing Greenhaven Road CapitalYarra Square Partners returned 19.5% net in 2020, outperforming its benchmark, the S&P 500, which returned 18.4% throughout the year. According to a copy of the firm's fourth-quarter and full-year letter to investors, which ValueWalk has been able to review, 2020 was a year of two halves for the investment manager. Q1 2021 hedge fund Read More


The survey also indicates that last year, only 11 percent of Americans thought it was either somewhat or very likely that they would lose their jobs. That’s a decrease from the record high in 2010 of 16 percent. It also meets the average of 11 percent the survey has found over the last 35 years.

Because the survey was completed last year, it’s possible that job market confidence has increased even further. January saw the number of layoffs in the U.S. drop to the lowest level it has been at in 12 years. Also, fewer people are applying for unemployment benefits weekly, although that number doesn’t account for those who are still unemployed but whose unemployment benefits have run out.

Last year there were almost 2.2 million jobs added to the U.S. economy, which averages out to approximately 180,000 per month.

No posts to display