Samsung Galaxy S7 rumors have started flying even before the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge have hit the retailers’ shelves. Last week, we saw an amazing Galaxy S7 concept with no bezels. Now a report coming out of South Korea claims that at least one variant of the “Galaxy S7” will have a flexible display. What’s more, the Korean electronics giant has placed orders for as many as 8 million flexible display panels a month for the Galaxy S7.

Galaxy S7: Samsung Seeks 8 Million Flexible Panels A Month
Source: Pixabay

Samsung expects massive demand for the flexible Galaxy S7

Citing an unnamed Samsung official, ETNews reports that Samsung Display will be responsible for the flexible display in the next flagship phone. Given that the Korean company treated Galaxy S6 Edge as a commercial phone rather than a niche product, the report of Samsung placing such a huge order for Galaxy S7 panels seems feasible.

The Galaxy S7 launch is about a year away. Samsung Display was facing difficulties producing flexible OLED panels for the Galaxy S6 Edge. Flexible displays use polyimide instead of a glass base to give the panel a greater flexibility and resilience. Polyimide is very difficult to process, so Samsung Display was planning to expand its A3 factory to ramp up production.

However, further investment in the A3 plant was postponed because of internal restructuring and the fact that polyimide manufacturing process also needed to change. Now that the electronics giant has asked Samsung Display to supply 8 million flexible panels a month for the Galaxy S7, the expansion of A3 plant is inevitable. ETNews notes that the upcoming Galaxy Note 5 will also feature a flexible OLED display.

Galaxy S7 to come with Iris scanning technology

Another report from Android Authority claims that Samsung could add the Iris scanning feature in its Galaxy S7. The company is working with the Stanford Research Institute to add Iris technology into mobile phones. It will offer fast, accurate and easy-to-use biometric identity management solutions. Stanford Research Institute claims that the Iris scanning technology is “1,000 times more accurate than published fingerprint data.