Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s iCloud security has reportedly been compromised by a pair of hackers who have been able to unlock as many as 30,000 stolen iPhones just in the last few days. The Dutch website De Telegraaf reports that one of the hackers is in the Netherlands and the other is in Casablanca.

icloud Apple Hack

Hackers unlock Apple devices

According to a translation of the Dutch article by Google Chrome, Chinese traders buy locked Apple Inc (NASDAQ:AAPL) devices on eBay Inc (NASDAQ:EBAY) for $50 to $150 each. The hackers are then able to unlock the devices even though Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) has “locked [them] because they are modified by the owner against his rules and are now easy to get rid of.” The phones can then be sold for a hefty profit.

In order to unlock those locked iPhones, the hackers use the apps on the phones to make them think they are communicating with Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s actual server—the one that’s used to activate Apple deices. Security experts are concerned that the hackers can do much more than just activate locked, stolen devices. They believe it might be possible that the hackers can also read iMessages and much more.

Hackers expose Apple security

The hackers reportedly claim that they aren’t seeking money by hacking Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s server. Instead, they say they just want to warn users of the company’s devices about the lack of security for iPhones and Apple’s iCloud online storage. They said they worked on the hack for five months to get it to work.

We were able to track down what looks to be a Twitter account linked with the Doulci group, @AquaXetine. Today the Twitter feed has a photo along with a tweet which claims that the hacker group “processed” over 5,700 devices in just five minutes.”

Apple remains silent on the alleged breach

The hackers said they notified Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) that they had breached iCloud back in March, but the company has not told users. Because of Apple’s silence, the hackers decided to tell Dutch media that they had breached the server in an attempt to get the company to admit that its security had been compromised. They say this issue is especially important because Apple has touted the safety of its products.

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) has not officially responded to the hackers’ claims or the reports from Dutch media, although the company is said to be working to plug the hole as quickly as possible.

Hackers love to play with Apple

While this may be the first time Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s iCloud server has actually been compromised, hackers have long loved to target the company’s products and services. In March, hackers reportedly targeted Apple IDs by compromising EA Games servers. In January, hackers claimed to have breached Apple’s database, although many accused the alleged hackers of simply playing a prank rather than actually breaching the database.

There has been a long history of other hackers targeting Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) as well, including everything from the fingerprint sensor on the iPhone 5S to simply hacking each version of iOS.