How to Tell What Your Prospect Is Thinking

By Dan Solin

April 1, 2014

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I am fascinated by the sophisticated technology used in political debates. Consultants pay focus groups to instantaneously record their reactions as the candidates discuss different issues. How valuable would it be if I such an insight into the thinking of someone listening to me? If I knew my audience’s reactions, I could adjust my presentation accordingly.

That goal is now within your grasp.

Insight into what your prospects are thinking while you are speaking requires a basic knowledge of how the brain processes information. If the information you are providing is not being retained in your prospect’s short- or long-term memory, you won’t be successful in converting that prospect into a client.

Our brains have the capacity to store an enormous amount of information. Those who study neuroscience have calculated that a human brain has enough storage capacity to hold three million hours of TV shows. That’s the good news.The bad news is the brain is selective about the kind of information it will hold in long-term memory. Everything we experience is processed through the sensory register of the brain. The information is then routed to a temporary holding area in short-term memory. Unless our brain perceives the information as meaningful, it gets dumped. How long we retain information in short-term memory varies with the type of information being processed. If we perceive danger, that information is immediately given priority by our short-term memory. However, if we determine that we are no longer in danger, we may forget the incident altogether. These tips offer insight into what your prospects maybe thinking while you present.

“When will this presentation end?”

The most likely thought going through your prospects’ brain while you are speaking is: “When will this presentation end?”

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