Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) unveiled its new products and services in an iPad event yesterday, most of which were highly anticipated by analysts and customers. However, the iPhone maker still managed to spring a few surprises, according to a report from 9to5mac.


A new suffix, biggest surprise from Apple

There were high expectations that Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) iPad 5 would adopt the design of the iPad mini, but the company released a product that is a step ahead of its predecessors—the iPad Air, a mild departure from previous name trends. Also, iPad Air runs on the M7 motion processing chip, which is a real surprise.

Data plan was unexpected

It was assumed that T-Mobile would start selling iPads this time, but no one expected that the carrier would also provide a data plan with the iPads. Customers can now use 200 MB of data without paying for it. With the data plan, T MOBILE US INC (NYSE:TMUS) takes a bite out of competitors AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T), Sprint Corporation (NYSE:S) and Verizon Communications Inc. (NYSE:VZ).

Many analysts and experts indicated that the days of paying for OS X updates will soon be over, and so it was announced by Apple. Users can now get OS X Mavericks for free. New users using OS X and iOS can now get iWork and iLife for free.

Apple reaffirmed that it will still sell iPad 2, which will be priced at $399.

Macs to get upgrades like phones and tablets

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) confirmed that iWork for iCloud will be equipped with tools like Google Docs, which will give multiple users a facility for editing documents in Pages, Keynote, or Numbers, all at once

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) revealed that users of Mac Books and Mac Computers will get upgrades to its Mac operating system iWork software suite, which competes with Microsoft Corp’s Excel, Word and other applications. With this, Apple makes available its free system software upgrades on the computer as well, previously available only on its phones and tablets.

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) Chief Executive Tim Cook told the gathering at San Francisco’s Yerba Buena Center, “We are turning the industry on its ear, but this is not why we’re doing it.”