The original iPhone will soon be given an ‘obsolete’ status, though with a few exceptions, says an internal Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) documentation. As per the document the iPhone, which was launched in 2007, will enter “obsolete” status. The change of status will take place on June 11, 2013, when iPhone models and other products including Macs and Xserve will be classified as vintage and obsolete products by Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)

Original iPhone

A vintage product, as described by Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s support site, is:

“those that were discontinued more than five and less than seven years ago. Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) has discontinued hardware service for vintage products with the following exception:

  • Products purchased in the state of California, United States, as required by statute.
  • Owners of vintage Macintosh products may obtain service and parts from Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) service providers within the state of California, United States.
  • Owners of vintage iPod products in the state of California may obtain service from Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) Retail Stores or by contacting AppleCare at 1-800-APL-CARE.”

So as per the site, a vintage product is one which has been for discontinued five to seven years ago, and does not enjoy any support services. The news can now be linked to an action announced over 18 months ago by AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T) to stop activating the original iPhone, without any roundabout solution.

From June onwards, the original iPhone will become obsolete in Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) stores in the US and globally. However, one can get the device serviced with AppleCare and Authorized Service Providers, provided one calls directly.

Users based in California will have a little advantage in terms of getting their devices serviced. According to the company’s website, vintage Macintosh owners “may obtain service and parts from Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) service providers.” And those who hold vintage iPod devices within California can get service at AppleCare or by visiting their local Apple Retail Store.

The first-generation iPhone had EDGE (2G) connectivity and 128 MB of RAM, and was replaced by iPhone3G 13 months later. When the original iPhone was launched, wireless network operators were still in the early stages of their 3G networks. AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T) was busy at that time with the HSUPA network, which offered a speed of 1.8 Mbps. Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) did not introduce 3G at that time in iPhone because it believed battery life would have been compromised.