Digital Forensics And The $400 Billion Problem
Image source: Pixabay

With the technology boom has been a boom of crime as well. Criminals look for every opportunity to gain an edge and currently their need to be sophisticated seems to outpace authorities in keeping up with rapid changes in the technology community. Meet Digital Forensics.

Cybersecurity requires strong passwords and paying attention to privacy policies, but that’s just scratching the surface. The technology world moves at lightning quick paces and, while keeping a secure account is well-intentioned, it is not nearly enough. Many industries are targeted and breached almost daily, which risks the company stability as well as personal and financial information of clients and customers.

Cybercrime is one of the FBI’s most significant concerns. It can take a real expert to deal with some of the more ingenious attacks, like the Sony PlayStation data hack or the Sony Pictures hack during the release of the film, The Interview. The digital world continues to evolve into more and more gadgets that store data in more and more places. As such, digital forensics is quickly moving beyond the more limited computer forensics.


(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

@media (max-width: 600px) {
#admobil {
display:none;
}
#adpost {
display:inline-block;
width:300px !important;
height:250px;
}
}

@media (min-width: 600px) {
#admobil {
display:none;
}
#adpost {
display:inline-block;
width:336px;
height:280px;
}
}

Digital devices are being used increasingly, not just for financial benefit, but for stalking, bullying, child exploitation, human trafficking, drug trafficking and even terrorism.  Fortunately, this leaves a trail for the clever detective to piece together. Historically, laws have not been able keep up with the multitude of ways that the industry and cybercriminals were evolving. Education was never quite sufficient enough either, but now very diverse and specific programs are being developed that help people keep pace with the modern world.

The complex digital world, which totals some $400 billion in annual online crimes, has also created a very lucrative job market. This infographic from Maryville University’s Cyber Security program outlines the past, present and future of digital forensics.

Digital ForensicsMaryville University