Earlier this week, Microsoft released Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 10525. It is the first release of Insider build since the software giant rolled out the retail version of its latest OS. Soon after installing the update, Fast Ring users began reporting issues on Google’s help forum, Reddit and social media. While the 32-bit version of Google Chrome was working fine on the new Windows 10 build, the 64-bit Chrome was consistently crashing.

Windows 10 Google Chrome

Google confirms Chrome issue in Windows 10 build 10525

Every time users open the 64-bit Google Chrome in Windows 10 Insider Build 10525, they get an error message and all the tabs crash immediately. Google confirmed that there was indeed an issue and the company was working to resolve it. The search engine giant pointed out that users in the Fast Ring of Windows Insider program should expect such issues because they are part of the fast ring experience.

Justin Schuh, a Google software engineer, acknowledged that it looked like “the sandbox is breaking in the Win10 10525 previews for 64-bit Chrome.” Google uses the sandbox, an anti-exploitation technology, to prevent attackers from leveraging a vulnerability to plant malware on a device. While engineers at Google are working to fix the issue, you can try a couple of workarounds to keep using Google Chrome without any hiccups.

Two simple and easy workarounds

The first one is pretty easy. Since the issue affects only 64-bit version, you can install the 32-bit version of Chrome. Justin Schuh suggested that the issue is related to the sandbox. So, the second way is to disable the sandbox mode in properties. Go to the Google Chrome desktop shortcut > Properties, and then add –no sandbox at the end of the target path.

Google Chrome

 

 

You’ll see a warning message the next time you launch Google Chrome. But the browser works without any hiccups. Microsoft never intended to end the Windows Insider program following the release of the consumer version of Windows 10. The Redmond-based company encouraged beta testers to keep testing the future version of Windows-as-a-service model.