Apple’s chief executive officer, Tim Cook, is one of the first big names to invest in a water-conserving shower head called Nebia. Cook has so much faith in the product, he even had the new shower heads installed in the corporate campus bathrooms in Cupertino.The Nebia shower head features a unique design with specialized nozzles to transform water into droplets to increase the surface area of the spray. Compared to most shower heads, which use about 20 gallons of water, the Nebia shower is said to roughly use six gallons per average use. Cook’s investment shows he is serious about making the world a greener place.

Apple Nebia

Nebia raising money through Kickstarter

The new water-conserving shower was created by a small startup in San Francisco ran by six people. Nebia received funding from Cook and Alphabet’s Eric Schmidt, but the company is also trying to get funds from a Kickstarter project. At the time of this writing, the project had already exceeded the $100,000 goal. And Apple isn’t the only company to test out the new shower heads. Equinox Gyms, Google and Stanford University already tested them and gave their approval.

The Nebia shower heads will hit the market next year and retail for $399. Backers for the Kickstarter program will get the new shower head for a discount at $299.

Why Nebia could transform showers forever

The Schmidt Foundation’s president, Wendy Schmidt, stated that she believes Nebia’s showering technology could be transformative. In addition to conserving water, it has an elegant and innovative design. Nebia’s founder Carlos Gomez Andonaegui added that he wanted to improve the shower head market with a better product and water conservancy. He first came up with the idea when he ran a health club chain years ago. He claimed water was a scarce resource at the club, so he and his father teamed up to design a better shower head. Later, Gomez Andonaegui collaborated with Philip Winter, who previously worked for a startup to create waterless toilets for people who lived in developing nations. They moved to San Francisco and were joined by Gabriel Parisi-Amon. The rest is history.

Source: NYTimes