Apple CEO Tim Cook recently spoke to The Washington Post, and addressed which books he is reading.

Apple may be gearing up for the release of the iPhone 7 and various other gadgets, but it seems that CEO Cook still makes time to read, writes Jena McGregor for Financial Review.

Tim Cook Apple AAPL
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Apple CEO inspired by stories of real people

Cook has a poster of Robert F. Kennedy on his office wall, and received an award from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights. The Apple CEO is a fan of the progressive idol, and is even reading an autobiography of him written by Larry Tye.

Bobby Kennedy: The Making of a Liberal Icon, aside from counting one of the world’s most powerful men among its readers, has garnered praise as “a complete portrait of a complex man” and “the definitive biography” of Kennedy. MSNBC host Joe Scarborough reviewed the book for The Washington Post, and said that it is “a fascinating and extensively researched biography that provides the most balanced view to date of this complicated liberal hero.”

Second on Cook’s reading list is The Story of My Experiments with Truth, an autobiography of Gandhi. It was first published as a serial in the 1920s, telling the story of the life of Gandhi and his development of civil disobedience. Cook reportedly bought the book during his recent trip to India.

Tim Cook enjoys graphic novels

“I tend to like non-fiction and particularly reading about people and how they lived and how they fought, and what motivated them and their philosophy and so forth,” Cook told The Post.

According to Cook, he sometimes dips into fiction, but he would “rather read about real people.”

The Apple CEO also recommends graphic novel trilogy March, about the civil rights movement. The books are the work of congressman John Lewis, who Cook invited to Apple headquarters last year.

“It is a very unique way to present what is probably the most important story of my entire lifetime,” Cook said when introducing Rep. Lewis at Apple, according to a report in Computerworld. “My hope is that everyone reads this, and I would love to see the day that it is required reading in every school.”

Cook also named Lewis as a public official that he is inspired by during his interview.

“I think he has such a great heart and also has the historical knowledge,” Cook said, “to able to both put things into perspective about everything that has been accomplished, but also recognise there’s a long way to go.”