Users are installing the iOS 9 much faster than they upgraded to iOS 8 last year. Apple revealed on its developer page Tuesday that the iOS 9 adoption has skyrocketed to 66%. It means two out of every three compatible devices now run the latest OS. The adoption rate spiked after last week’s iOS 9.1 update, which brought numerous bug fixes, new emoji support, and Live Photos tweaks.

iOS 9.1 Middle Finger

Apple flaunts impressive iOS 9 adoption figures

Notably, the iOS 9 adoption stood at 61% two weeks ago. Immediately after its release in September, Apple declared that 51% of iOS devices were running the latest version, making it the fastest iOS adoption ever. By comparison, the iOS 8 had achieved only 64% adoption by December 23, 68% by January 7, and 87% on the eve of the iOS 9 rollout.

iOS 9 Adoption

The iOS 8 was marred by bugs, lack of impressive features, and a requirement of 5GB storage space. So, Apple reduced the iOS 9 update size to just 1.3GB. Since the iOS 8 saw a poor adoption rate, it’s no surprise the Cupertino-based tech giant is flaunting the impressive iOS 9 figures. It will encourage developers to make use of more iOS 9-specific features to add more functionality to their apps, further giving users a reason to upgrade.

Apple pushes out iOS 9.2 beta 2 to developers

Last week’s iOS 9.1 introduced 150 new emojis. The update also allows the iPhone 6S and 6S Plus to sense when the device is being raised or lowered to prevent the rear camera from inadvertent recording. Earlier on Wednesday, Apple pushed out the second beta version of iOS 9.2 to developers, the second major update to the OS.

The iOS 9.2 beta 2 includes changes to Safari that enable extensions while running in third-party apps. It also has built-in support for AT&T’s NumberSync technology. Currently, the Continuity feature lets users use their iPad, iPod Touch or Mac to make phone calls as long as the respective device is connected to the same WiFi network as their iPhone. This software upgrade would let you enable WiFi calling on your Mac or iOS devices, and make calls even when these devices are not on the same network as your iPhone.