Sony is set to revive the Walkman with high-tech features including high-resolution playback and Bluetooth-connected headphones. It also features a 60-hour battery life, aluminum body, and 128 GB of internal storage.

Sony Revives Walkman With High-Resolution Playback

The new Sony Walkman

Sony’s new Walkman also features the S-Master HX digital amplifier, which provides a better music listening experience. The improved technology actually processes large amounts of data while minimizing noise. Thanks to the new Walkman’s solid aluminum alloy frame, this old-school gadget really has a modern look that should appeal to today’s design-conscious consumers.

The only downside to the new Walkman is the price. Sony will charge $1,119.99. Unlike previous devices, this version does not play compact discs or MP3 files. Instead it plays compressed high-resolution files with wider bandwidth for a richer sound similar to what you would hear in a recording studio or concert hall.

A first for the Walkman

The new Walkman is the first ever that supports LDAC codec, a new audio technology which allows music fans to listen to wireless audio through Bluetooth. It transmits data three times as efficiently as previous Bluetooth connections. And thanks to the 128GB of storage, it’s possible to store over 1700 high-resolution songs. The official press release for the device stated, “Dual-band (2.4/5 GHz) Wi-Fi compatibility lets you enjoy Hi-Res music stored on your DLNA home network, free of electrical interference. The player also supports a USB audio connection function for direct, jitter-free digital connection to portable headphone amps and USB DAC amps.”

Not surprisingly, there is already something similar on the market with the Pono high-fidelity player. This device was backed by Neil Young and retails for $399.

Sony’s new Walkman will debut in the spring in Europe. There’s no word yet on whether the device will be released in the United States as well. Sony’s attempt to revive the portable music player should prove interesting considering the Japanese tech company scrapped the original Walkman cassette player in 2010.