Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) is known for offering its subscribers top quality original shows, and the next big project it plans is the survivalist thriller series Between, which will be delivered in partnership with City Stations. Owned by Rogers Communications, the Canadian broadcaster is a video-on-demand service provider, and is a rival to Netflix. This pairing between the rivals is unusual, but the two firms will produce six episodes of the show together.

Netflix, Inc. Teams With Canadian Rival To Develop Original Content

Netflix can stream the show outside Canada

The series will be telecast first in Canada and later on it will also be made available on Shomi, which is a VOD service from Rogers as per the agreement. Shomi will be launched later this fall. Outside Canada, the rights of Between will be owned by Netflix, and the company will be able to telecast the show on its Canadian service after a year.

“Teaming up with Rogers on ‘Between’ is a tremendous opportunity to work with a creative partner in Canada to bring our global viewers top-notch content,” noted Erik Barmack, Netflix’s vice-president of global content.

The show revolves around a mysterious disease that affects only those in the town aged over 21 and kills them eventually. The thriller has been created by McGowan, director of homegrown films like One Week and Saint Ralph, and stars Jennette McCurdy from the Nickelodeon TV series iCarly and Sam & Cat, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Partner, also, a rival

Netflix has grown hugely popular in Canada, and this compelled the Canadian broadcasters Rogers and Shaw communications to introduce a new on-demand service under the name Shomi. The streaming platform is expected to launch in November, and initially the customers of the two cable companies will be the only ones to enjoy the service.

Even though Between is the first original Canadian production for Netflix, the streaming company films the horror series Hemlock Grove in Ontario. Exclusive rights for the two new seasons of Trailer Park Boys have also been recently bought by the California-based company.

Recently, Netflix had a tiff with the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission over regulating its service in similar ways to conventional broadcasters. It argued that it is not a conventional broadcaster and therefore its services did not fall under the Broadcasting Act. Netflix will be required to make certain financial commitments to Canadian content if it is ruled to come under the Broadcasting Act.