In an earlier post today following a recall announcement by Google’s Nest Labs, I dubbed 2014 “The Year of The Recall” when I wrote, “2014 may very well come to be known the “Year Of The Recall” due to General Motors but others will certainly join the automaker before year’s end.” Within minutes, and while using an advertising campaign from days past, I was given further ammunition to my claim, “You asked for it you got it……Toyota.”

Toyota Logo

Toyota defects with a good dose of humor

Today, Toyota Motor Corporation (NYSE:TM) (TYO:7203) announced a recall of 370,000 Sienna minivans. Somewhat ironically, most of those being recalled have were already recalled in 2004-2010 due to the vehicles pesky habit of throwing loose the spare tire under the vehicle into following traffic.

Additionally, Toyota Motor Corporation (NYSE:TM) (TYO:7203) recalled 10,500 2013-model Lexus GS 350 sedans has the equally annoying habit of applying the brakes with no help from the driver when it feels like it and just to make it worse, does so without activating the brake lights to alert drivers to its possessed nature and need to come to an abrupt halt to rest for a bit(?).

And lastly, for now at least, the company announced that dealers need to reprogram airbag software on 2014 Highlander and Highlander hybrid crossover SUVs for the fool’s errand of assuming that everyone in the car (in America) is not getting heavier but losing weight. As a consequence of its forced non-existent weight loss the system can, on a whim, determine that all front passengers are “light” as a result the airbags in the event of a crash are under inflated which leaves drivers kissing the steering wheel and passengers examining the contents of the glove box from really close range at a high rate of speed.

Not really a recall?

Technically the airbag issue isn’t a recall, but rather, a “non-compliance” report which simply means the car doesn’t meet a federal safety standard. Though I doubt those affected will say “Tomato/Potato” (Yes, I know the expression and I’m guessing you do as well, just didn’t feel the need for a pronunciation spelling when I’m guessing you’ll get my meaning.)

Despite all this, the automaker made it clear (lawyers insistence?) that it knows of no injuries or deaths caused by any of these three defects disclosed today.

The Sienna recall is limited to minivans sold in cold-weather states who use a corrosive salt mixture to remove ice from winter roads. The mixture can eat away at the mechanism that hold the spare tire in place. In the earlier recall, a splash shield was installed and the mechanism was sprayed with a rust-inhibitor. Unfortunately, the splash shields in some cases were installed incorrectly and the rust-inhibitor used wasn’t up to snuff.

The fact that I walk nearly everywhere is proving sounder and sounder with each news day it seems recently.