Each Monday sees Tim Bajarin, president of Creative Strategies Inc., contribute to Time magazine’s tech blog. Today, Mr. Bajarin suggest what Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) can do for the impending TV revolution, either with Apple TV or by simply providing television producers with ways to augment their programming as more and more people watch live TV with either a smartphone or a tablet next to them.

Apple

Bajarin began his weekly column today with a chicken versus egg argument that quickly had him deciding that hardware generally precedes software. He points out that when Eddie Roberts built the first PC in 1974 it was nothing more than some chips soldered to a motherboard before enlisting the help of Bill Gates and Paul Allen. While the Altair 8800 couldn’t function without software, the hardware did, indeed, come first.

Hardware is Key to Revolutionary Capability

Recognizing that this was the future, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak decided to have a go at what would ultimately become the Apple I and Apple II. They too, focused on hardware first as IBM did when it forayed into this new arena of personal computing. Like Eddie Roberts, it sought out Gates and Allen, giving birth to MS-DOS, the launching point, or backbone to Windows.

Mr. Bajarin points out in his column that almost without fail, the technology we use continues to be developed in this manner when he writes…

This pattern can be tracked to pretty much all of our smart tech products. It starts with hardware, followed by a smart operating system, followed by an SDK. Apple created the iPhone and simultaneously built what’s now called iOS to give it intelligence. Apple then created an SDK for software developers to create apps for use on this device.

Apple Remaking Television Hardware

Mr. Bajarin believes that TV is dumb, but it will be Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL), not Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) or Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) that provides the SDK and API necessary for developers to rethink television as we know it.

He believes that it is just a matter of time before Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) develops something that allows Jeopardy watchers to play along, sports fans to see more statistics than an MIT course, and a wealth of interactive opportunities.

Following the model of the PC, smartphone, and tablet—the hardware, followed by a smart operating system and developers’ tools, Mr. Bajarin sees Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) remaking the simple hardware that is the television in the near future.