There is an old story that appeared in a long forgotten religious tome of Christianity, Judaism, or Islam. I simply forget which one. Anyways, it suggests that Moses, who did a lot of cardio apparently, but neglected his core and work with the weight machines, dropped two tablets on his way down from Mt. Sinai. It is for this reason that we don’t have Commandments 1a, 1b, 4a, 4b, etc.


There are various historical divisions of Exodus 20:1–17, based on religion. Consequently, adultery is either the Sixth or the Seventh Commandment. Which ever way, Moses’ misstep has left us without 6b or 7b depending on your faith…..thou shall not commit Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) adultery. That may actually have been Mel Brooks.

Break Down Of  Netflix Study By Maureen O’Conner

In a fantastic piece by Maureen O’Conner on New York Magazine’s website, specifically, The Cut, she broke down a study by Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) on “Netflix Adultery.” “Netflix Adultery,” which was coined by the writers at The Cut, is when a partner has promised the other that “I won’t watch it without you,” or something to that extent. While I like to think of myself as a good writer with moments of genius irreverence, I must defer to Ms. O’Conner’s take on Netflix’s survey …

In a study of 2000 American adults, 12 percent confessed to watching ahead on TV shows they were supposed to save to watch with their partners. Ten percent admitted to being the victim of Netflix adultery, which means either 2 percent are blissfully unaware of their partners’ indiscretions, or the cheaters are hitting multiple victims.

Of those who cheated, 66 percent did so “at home by themselves on the main TV.” A shocking 21 percent confessed to watching in bed while their significant other slept. (This is my modus operandi, and it is shameful.) Forty-one percent of cheaters refrained from revealing spoilers; 12 percent would rewatch and “fake it” in their reactions; 14 percent felt so guilty they confessed to cheating.

She also added that…..

Seventy-seven percent of men ages 18 to 34 said they would cheat, whereas only 57 percent of women that age said they would. As for people actually in relationships (not all of the men and women were), 51 percent of committed adults said they had or would commit Netflix adultery, if the moment was right and Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) was looking particularly foxy that night.

Back to me….

House of Cards made it clear that Netflix does its research and handles big data well, without which they would never have been able to spy the series from your viewing habits. Netflix adultery is as real any other infidelity. It conjures up feelings of broken trust that may never be repaired. That is why Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) is washing its hands of responsibility in the matter.

“Netflix continues to revolutionize entertainment by letting our members watch great content whenever and wherever they want, which seems to be leading to a cultural phenomenon of ‘stream cheating.’ With that said, Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) can’t be held responsible for any trust issues, lovers’ spats, or marital troubles that arise from watching ahead of your partner. We also will not cover any therapy sessions. As always, we advise to Watch Responsibly,” said Ted Sarandos, Chief Content Officer at Netflix.