Apple Spaceship

Last year, Steve Jobs presented plans for a 2.8 million square foot spaceship style campus to the city council in Cupertino. Unfortunately, that project has been delayed and won’t open until 2016. The new campus was originally poised to open in 2015.

According to Bloomberg, Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) filed for a revised timetable with the City of Cupertino just a few weeks ago. The company noticed delays that affect the environmental impact report for the city. Unfortunately, this means that Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) may not be able to start the project until 2014.

The new campus design is said to include a circular office, research and development building, large auditorium, plant, fitness center, and another research facility. The new campus was designed to make the work environment more efficient for their employees.  The company also attempts to generate their own electricity.

The mayor of Cupertino, Gilbert Wong, explained during a press conference last summer, “The mothership has landed here in Cupertino,” responding to Jobs’ proposed new “mothership”. There is no chance that we’re saying no. Every time that we have a large company that has a large sales tax produced, we are very accommodating to that company.”

Cupertino’s city manager, David Brandt, also shared the following with Bloomberg, “They could conceivably break ground in 2013, but only if everything goes smoothly. The project is running a little bit slow.”

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) originally planned to start building their new campus in 2013.

The company’s current campus has roughly between 2,600 and 2,800 employees working inside at any given time, but there are still 12,000 or so employees scattered across the city, holding their various projects in temporary rental buildings. The new 2.8 million square foot building reportedly holds about 13,000 employees.

This huge project should help Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) and their employees in a big way. Building a larger company headquarters will hopefully increase employee productivity and help them increase their bottom line.