Toyota Motor Corporation (NYSE:TM) is holding a worldwide recall on 7.4 million vehicles, all thanks to the recent discovery of a faulty window switch. The recall affects about 2.5 million cars in the United States.

The problem with the electric window switch is that it feels uneven and may stick over time. The auto maker stresses that it’s not a dangerous problem and that there is no risk of fire.

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The last big automotive recall happened sixteen years ago, when Ford recalled eight million cars over defective switches in the ignition.

Eversheds Law Firm’s Richard Matthews explained the situation, ” Recalls in the automotive sector are not rare events, but the size and scale of this particular recall is unusual. Toyota faced heavy public scrutiny for the way it handled recalls in 2009-10, culminating in a record fine of $16.4m (£10.2bn) from the US transportation department. Toyota’s approach this time around is perhaps indicative of an increasingly ‘belt and braces’ approach to managing risk.”

This wasn’t the first recall for the Japanese auto maker. Overall the company has recalled a number of vehicles from 2009 to 2011 over a number of reasons.

The list of recalled cars in the United States include the following:

2007-2008 Yaris(110,300 vehicles)

2007-2009 RAV4(336,400 vehicles)

2007-2009 Tundra(337,100 vehicles)

2007-2009 Camry(938,100 vehicles)

2007-2009 Camry Hybrid(116,800 vehicles)

2008-2009 Scion xD(34,400 vehicles)

2008-2009 Scion xA(77,500 vehicles)

2008-2009 Sequoia(38,500 vehicles)

2008 Highlander(135,400 vehicles)

2008 Highlander Hybrid(23,200 vehicles)

2009 Corolla(270,900 vehicles)

2009 Matrix(53,800 vehicles)

This massive recall certainly doesn’t paint Toyota Motor Corporation (NYSE:TM) in a good light, and it might just end up tarnishing the company’s name even more.  If an auto maker  fails to thoroughly check or test their cars before allowing them to be sold on the market, then they’ve just created a huge problem for their company. I’m not sure why Toyota Motor Corporation (NYSE:TM) keeps missing the mark here, but I think it’s just a matter of time until the company is ready to own up to their mistakes and make some key changes.