Tesla Model S vs. Model X vs. Model 3 Comparison

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Tesla Model S vs. Model X vs. Model 3 Comparison
Blomst / Pixabay

Tesla is the American car manufacturer known for making the electric car sexy, and in March, it unveiled the latest in its line of premium electric vehicles, the Model 3. With more than 198,000 preorders, it became the most popular electric car to date. However, is it the better option when compared to the Model X or Model S?

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Model S

The Model S was first introduced in June 2012 and is a full-sized five-door, lift back electric car. It comes in different configurations, which include different performance options and interior and exterior design choices.

Model X

The Tesla Model X is a full-size crossover SUV, and Tesla began shipping it to select customers in September 2015. As with the Model S, it is available in different configurations, which include multiple performance options and both interior and exterior design choices.

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Model 3

First announced in March and firmly aimed at the affordable car market, the Model 3 has been designed with low cost and high volume in mind. Initially, preorders hit 198,000, but just three days after its announcement, it reached a staggering 276,000. The Model 3 is a four-door, five-seater car with a full electric powertrain; it is also rear-wheel drive with an all-wheel-drive motor option available.

Now that you have been introduced to all three current Tesla models, we will take a look at a few of the features each car has and compare them.

Performance

The Model 3 can travel as far as 215 miles on a single charge. Yes, that it a little less than the ranges of the Model X and Model S, but it is to be expected from a car that costs much less to manufacture and purchase. The P90D version of the Model X has been reported by to have traveled as far as 250 miles on a single charge. Tesla claims its 90D variant can travel 257 miles on a full charge and that the 70D can go 220 miles. The Model S is clearly the winner in terms of driving range, although by a narrow margin as its P90D variant can travel 253 miles, the 90D version can go 270 miles, and the 70D can travel 240 miles on a single charge.

The Model X can go from 0 to 60 miles per hour in 3.8 seconds, while the Model S does it in 2.8 seconds, and the Model 3 does it in around 4 seconds. So again, the Model S wins with a surprisingly fast 0 to 60 turnaround time.

Features

The Model X, Model S and Model 3 all feature Autopilot systems; however, the Model X has Falcon wing doors, which can detect when they are about to hit something or something is about to hit them.

Safety

The Model X received a five-star rating for every safety rating possible when it was first tested. The Model S set a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) record in 2013 and received top marks in every subcategory.

Meanwhile, the Model S has had some problems with its Autopilot feature, which comes fitted as standard. It appears that it failed to spot a truck and caused a driver to lose his life. However, Tesla CEO Elon Musk shifted the blame to the vehicle’s braking system, and he still expects the Model 3 to receive a five-star safety rating.

Price

Even though the Model 3 will be the cheapest of the three EVs to manufacture and also the cheapest of the three cars by far at $35,000, it is the clear winner in both value and mass market appeal.

To put this into perspective, the Model X starts at around $80,000, and the Model S at $70,000.

Final thoughts

While the Model 3 does not come with all of the bells and whistles found on the other two vehicles, it is the most cost efficient and consumer-focused car Tesla has produced yet. And with its lower price, it is believed that this car could pave the way for a future Model Y and domination of the electric vehicle market for Tesla.

The Model X and Model S, on the other hand, are the perfect luxury cars for people who want an expensive and high-quality electric car.

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Darren is a proud father of two and a dedicated mobile technology writer from the UK. He's been writing about all things mobile, wearable, apps and anything else tech related for many years now for various sites all over the world.
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7 COMMENTS

  1. Hi Ken, I agree these are not real world figures, but each and every driver of a Model X, S and 3 would produce unique numbers based on tyre wear, average MPH, road conditions, wind spread, and traffic conditions, and how a vehicle is driven.

    So, that means the subject of performance is a highly subjective one.

  2. How are they wrong? The figures quoted for the specific models come from Tesla and are the miles per charge seen at an average of 60MPH. Yes, I agree these are not real world figures, but each and every driver of a Model X, S and 3 would produce unique numbers based on tyre wear, average MPH, road conditions, wind spread, and traffic conditions, and how a vehicle is driven.

    So, that makes the subject of performance highly subjective.

  3. Your numbers are wrong……ALL your numbers are wrong!!!!! I’m not gonna correct them for you…do your own research!

  4. Your figures and numbers are out of date. My 90D has gone 270 miles for me and wasn’t empty as is has a 294 mile range. The 90D also does 0-60 in 4.1 sec, P90D does 0-60 in 3.1 Sec and has an option to takes that to 0-60 in 2.7 sec which is insane.

  5. Now that I have finished reading it some of your info is a little bit off. I recommend having someone read through and double check things.

  6. Ummmm this is in the article. Typo anyone.
    “To put this into perspective, the Model X starts at around $80,000, and the Model X at $70,000.”

    Also your images are mixed up too.

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