Apple recently introduced a Smart Battery Case priced at $99 for the iPhone 6s, the design of which has not been liked by anyone. But CEO Tim Cook defended the case, saying, he “wouldn’t call it ‘the hump,'” but the company laid greater emphasis on usability rather than design.

Apple CEO Tim Cook Defends Smart Case's Design

Why is it designed in such a way?

“One of the real insights here is, have you ever used other cases and tried to get them on?” Cook said in an interview with Mashable.

By this, Cook meant that the other cases available in the market, like the competing Mophie, have a stiff plastic design that makes them too hard to get on or off. And if we look at the Amazon reviews for similar products, we find that Cook’s claim has a strong backing.

Commenting on the case, Tech Insider said that though the case helps in extending the battery life of the device, “It’s like Apple’s silicone case for the iPhone, but with a weird growth on its back.”

But, after Cook’s comments, it can be said that the “weird growth” in Apple’s Case is a bend in the plastic that helps in putting the case on and off without much struggle.

Apple’s Smart Case not for all

Cook added that the case should not be seen as a response to the criticisms of poor battery life that the new iPhone models have. Rather, it should be seen as an accessory that is intended to offer a little extra boost to users in need of it. The Apple CEO said the case is not meant for people who are able to charge their device on a daily basis. Rather, it is meant for those out on a hiking trip or who take overnight trips.

Apple case, when put on the iPhone, shows up on users’ Today widget screen, and this is the reason Apple calls it a “smart” case. When the case is put on charge while it is on the phone, users can see their phones’ charge and how much juice the case has, even on the lock screen.

If the user puts the case/phone on a charger with a computer that has an output of 10W or a charger with an output of 12W, the phone and the case charge together. When plugged in normally, the device gets charged first, and then the case.