Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) is preparing to launch its Broadwell and Skylake chipsets in 2015, which will result in PC customers muddling over which architecture to buy, says a report from the PC World. The chip maker is is taking a rather unusual step by introducing two new architectures so close together.

Intel Corporation Launching Broadwell, Skylake Chips Back to Back

An unusual move from Intel

In the first-quarter of 2015, manufacturers will ship Broadwell — Intel’s fifth-generation core processors for PCs. In the second half of the year, customers will be able to buy PCs based on Skylake architecture, which will introduce wire-free computing and substantial power upgrades.

Intel is aiming to introduce the latest technology to buyers without any further delay and retire Broadwell as soon as possible. It was widely accepted that Broadwell-powered PCs would be in the market this year, but were postponed due to the manufacturing issues and delayed chip shipments.

During last week’s Intel Developer Forum (IDF), Kirk Skaugen, general manager of Intel PC Client Group, said that Skylake chips will be the biggest PC innovation over the past decade, which will introduce wireless charging as well as increased battery performance and power efficiency. Broadwell was sparsely mentioned during IDF, except for a few new PCs including a small desktop.

Analysts prefer Skylake

According to analysts, consumers will buy laptops and PCs based on their needs, but those who are more concerned about performance and features might skip Broadwell and buy Skylake a few months later. Moreover, the possibility of more people waiting for Skylake PCs will increase in 2015.

Jim McGregor, principal analyst at Tirias Research, said that Broadwell architecture PCs will be obsolete soon after its launch. The launch of Skylake so soon and with advanced features is a good reason to wait.

“If you’re really a technophobe, you may want to wait for Skylake,” McGregor said.

With Skylake on the market, Intel can shut down Broadwell, which will help in lowering the price of PCs by year  end. This could be good news for users waiting for a low-cost PC, and it will also increase PC demand according to McGregor.

Dean McCarron, principal analyst at Mercury Research, said that Skylake chips will power niche PCs first, and adds that there is always a class of users who look forward to buying the latest technology.