Risk Management and Basic Rule of Asset-Liability Management

0
Risk Management and Basic Rule of Asset-Liability Management

There’s kind of a rule of thumb in Asset-Liability management, that you match liquidity over the next 12 months, and match interest rate sensitivity overall.  I would do more than that, creating my own randomized interest rate models, as well as a new way of creating structured randomness in simulation models.  For a brief period of time, I had one of the best multivariate randomness programs out there, eliminating the problem of correlations in higher dimensions common with Hammersly points.  (My work was not theoretical, but intuitive… once I saw how the randomness was created, I figured out how to de-correlate the higher dimensions (since it was based on prime numbers, create more number than you need, and use a higher prime number to select observations.)

Anyway, when I brought my full-interest rate curve scenarios to the investment department in 1994, they said to me, “These are the first realistic interest rate scenarios we have ever seen.  Did you constrain them?”  I told them “No, just weak mean reversion.  Noise dominates in the short run, mean reversion dominates in the long run.”

As a result, for the lines of business over which I had oversight, we measured our interest rate mismatch in terms of days, weeks, and months, but never years.  Please ignore this incident where things drifted, but worked out exceptionally well (really, that should be a part of this series).  We published a document to show everyone how well we managed interest rate risk in Provident Mutual’s pension division.  We used scenarios far beyond what was required to show how well we did our work.  The regulators never complained.

Despite 60% Loss On Shorts, Yarra Square Up 20% In 2020

Yarra Square Investing Greenhaven Road CapitalYarra Square Partners returned 19.5% net in 2020, outperforming its benchmark, the S&P 500, which returned 18.4% throughout the year. According to a copy of the firm's fourth-quarter and full-year letter to investors, which ValueWalk has been able to review, 2020 was a year of two halves for the investment manager. Q1 2021 hedge fund Read More


At that point in time, the ability to integrate residential mortgage-backed securities into cash flow analyses was rudimentary at best.  But I found ways to make it work, most of the time.  That said, I remember joking with the MBS manager in late 1993, and saying there was a new term for a well-protected PAC bond.  He asked, “What is it?”  I replied, “Cash.”  He sarcastically said, “Oh, you are so funny.”   That said, I pointed out to the investment department that some of their bonds that they thought would last another four years would disappear in 2-3 months.

Then there was the floating rate guaranteed investment contract project that I eventually killed because it was impossible.  You can’t argue with expectations that are unrealistic.  Even better, I beat the Goldman Sachs representative.

In running the GIC desk at Provident Mutual, I had to review a lot of strategies because making money on short-term bonds/loans was difficult, and difficult the degree that I doubted as to whether we were in a good business.  On the bright side, I protected the firm until the day that we  could not write any more  GICs, because our credit quality was too low.  That was the fault of the less entrepreneurial part of the company, so I couldn’t so much about it, except close my operations down.  I asked the senior management team to provide a guarantee to my GICs, but they refused.

As such, I shut the line of business down.  With clients that were unreasonable over credit quality, and management unwilling to extend credit protection to GICs, the battle over GICs was ended, and I sent the line into runoff.

Five years later, as we were now part of the same firm I stood at the estate of John Dwight, with a young woman that I had sold the last GIC of Provident Mutual to, I said, “The end of the GIC business of Provident Mutual.”  We talked, she smiled, but it was part of the end of an era, because GICs were a minority of the assets in Stable Value funds.

If nothing else, this helps to highlight the impermanence of all that is done in financial firms.  I know this in my own life, but I am sure that it is true for most people in finance.

By David Merkel, CFA of Aleph Blog

Previous article Howard Marks: Cyprus Example of Uncertainty in Europe [VIDEO]
Next article Why Employers Ask Weird Questions on Job Interviews [INFOGRAPH]
David J. Merkel, CFA, FSA — 2010-present, I am working on setting up my own equity asset management shop, tentatively called Aleph Investments. It is possible that I might do a joint venture with someone else if we can do more together than separately. From 2008-2010, I was the Chief Economist and Director of Research of Finacorp Securities. I did a many things for Finacorp, mainly research and analysis on a wide variety of fixed income and equity securities, and trading strategies. Until 2007, I was a senior investment analyst at Hovde Capital, responsible for analysis and valuation of investment opportunities for the FIP funds, particularly of companies in the insurance industry. I also managed the internal profit sharing and charitable endowment monies of the firm. From 2003-2007, I was a leading commentator at the investment website RealMoney.com. Back in 2003, after several years of correspondence, James Cramer invited me to write for the site, and I wrote for RealMoney on equity and bond portfolio management, macroeconomics, derivatives, quantitative strategies, insurance issues, corporate governance, etc. My specialty is looking at the interlinkages in the markets in order to understand individual markets better. I no longer contribute to RealMoney; I scaled it back because my work duties have gotten larger, and I began this blog to develop a distinct voice with a wider distribution. After three-plus year of operation, I believe I have achieved that. Prior to joining Hovde in 2003, I managed corporate bonds for Dwight Asset Management. In 1998, I joined the Mount Washington Investment Group as the Mortgage Bond and Asset Liability manager after working with Provident Mutual, AIG and Pacific Standard Life. My background as a life actuary has given me a different perspective on investing. How do you earn money without taking undue risk? How do you convey ideas about investing while showing a proper level of uncertainty on the likelihood of success? How do the various markets fit together, telling us us a broader story than any single piece? These are the themes that I will deal with in this blog. I hold bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Johns Hopkins University. In my spare time, I take care of our eight children with my wonderful wife Ruth.

No posts to display