New Apple Mac Pro Price: Why Is It So Expensive?

Apple is known for its fancier design when it comes to the iPhone design, as well as of its other products, so a higher price on its iMac and MacBook options doesn’t surprise anyone anymore. But now that the new Apple Mac Pro price became available, as the company listed its new products for ordering, it does raise a lot of eyebrows. The cheapest option of the new Apple Mac Pro price starts at $5,999 but it can go up to as high as $52,599 if you want the highest specs.

New Apple Mac Pro Price

Image source: Apple / YouTube video (screenshot)

The $5,999 starting price is already pretty hefty, let alone the $50,000 + price tag. Apple wanted to feature the most powerful Mac Pro option ever made, but it’s most likely something that most people can’t or don’t even want to afford. Here’s why the new Apple Mac Pro price can go so high.

When you enter Apple’s showroom and go for the Mac Pro option, you’ll be presented with two starting options. The tower option that starts at $5,999 is immediately available, while the other option, a rack, starts at $6,499 and is not available yet. Once you pick the tower option, you’ll be able to configure it and adjust it to your own needs. However, the price goes up.

The base option is available with 32GB of RAM, an octa-core Intel Xeon CPU, as well as 256GB of SSD storage and Radeon Pro 580X graphics. If that’s not enough for you, you can choose to upgrade your rig.

If you choose to opt for a 28-Core, Intel Xeon W with performance of 2.5GHz and Turbo Boost up to 4.4GHz, you’ll have to squeeze out another $7,000. Additionally, if you want to have among the fastest RAMs in the world and opt for 1.5TB of RAM which breaks down into 12 units of 128GB memory, you’ll have to add $25,000 more.

If you thought that’s a lot for the new Apple Mac Pro price, the company allows you to add 4TB of SSD storage split into two 2TB SSDs for $1,400. However, the company notes that you’ll be able to expand your storage even more, with 8TB function being available in the future.

If you want to ensure you’ll run the most powerful games and the most graphics-demanding apps in the future, there’s an option to add two AMD Radeon Pro Vega II Duo Graphics modules which contain two GPUs inside. That makes for a total of four graphics cards each equipped with 32GB of dedicated RAM, which, in total would cost $10,800.

Some additional features include an Afterburner accelerator card which costs $2,000 and wheels for the tower which cost $400. After all, given you’ll run such powerful and chunky specs, it’s only normal you’ll need wheels to move it into another room.

The bundle comes with a Magic Keyboard and Magic Mouse which are silver in color and don’t come with an additional price, exclusive only to Mac Pro buyers. You can however, get the Magic TrackPad available in a silver or black color scheme for $50.

When the most expensive options are picked, the total price becomes $52,599, which would be way too much for the average buyer, although given the specs, the new Apple Mac Pro isn’t intended for the average buyer.

Instead of opting for the most expensive components, you can squeeze anything in between. The 1TB and 2TB of storage are available for $400 and $800 respectively, while there are also different variations of graphics listed under different prices. You can get 48 GB of RAM for $300, while 96, 192, 384 and 768GB of RAM are available for an additional $300, $1000, $3000, and $6000 respectively. You can also choose different CPU configurations, although keep in mind that the 1.5 TB of RAM is only available for the 24-core or 28-core CPU option, likely to fit the performance and compatibility of the components.

Optionally, the new Apple Mac Pro price can go up even more if you pick one of Apple’s Pro Display XDR monitors which start at $4,999. The more advanced, matte nano-texture display is available for $5,999. Additionally, you’ll need the controversial stand which was featured earlier this year for $999.

What do you think about the new Apple Mac Pro price? It’s obvious that this product is targeted toward consumers who don’t find the price a problem, but is such a device too much for currently-required demands in terms of computing?



About the Author

Danica Simic
Danica Simic has been writing ever since she was a child. Before she started writing for ValueWalk she was reviewing laptops, headphones and gaming equipment as well as writing articles about astronomy and game development. Danica is a student of applied and computational physics while also studying software and data engineering. Her hobbies include reading, swimming, drawing and gaming whenever she has free time. - Email her at dsimic@valuewalk.com