Microsoft Surface Duo vs Galaxy Fold: Which is better?

Microsoft is making a comeback into the smartphone world with a splash. At a time when smartphone makers are focusing on  foldable phones, the Redmond-based software giant has showcased a dual-screen smartphone called the Surface Duo. It is seen as the first formidable challenge to phones with folding displays, such as the Galaxy Fold. If you were planning to buy the Galaxy Fold but now are confused about whether to buy it now or wait for the Surface Duo, then our Surface Duo vs Galaxy Fold comparison could help you make a decision.

Surface Duo vs Galaxy Fold: screen

The Microsoft Surface Duo is very different from the Samsung Galaxy Fold. The most basic difference in the Surface Duo vs the Galaxy Fold is in the screen, where the former has two separate displays, unlike the one foldable display in the Galaxy Fold. Since there are two separate displays, the Surface Duo won’t have that annoying crease.

Further, the Surface Duo features glass screens, unlike the Galaxy Fold which is equipped with a specially-made polymer screen. The Galaxy Fold’s screen is so delicate and prone to damage that Samsung had to include special instructions for owners. There are reports that the Surface Duo’s screen is made of Gorilla Glass. If that is the case, it would mean a more durable screen than the one on the Galaxy Fold.

As far as the screen size, the Surface Duo features two 5.6-inch displays. On the other hand, the Galaxy Fold, when unfolded, offers a 7.3-inch screen. Microsoft’s phone has no outer screen, while the Galaxy Fold has a 4.6-inch display on the outside.

One can open and close Microsoft’s Surface Duo like a book or use it fully or partially open. You can also stand it up to watch a movie or use one side as a screen and the other as a touch-screen keyboard or game pad. Although the Galaxy Fold can also be used when folded or fully extended, it works best when it is fully opened.

Other differences

Other than the screen, there are other notable differences in the Surface Duo vs the Galaxy Fold.

One major disadvantage of the Galaxy Fold is that it doesn’t work with a digital pen due to the fragile screen. This limits use of the device when it comes to productivity and creativity. However, with the Surface Duo, there will be no such issues as its screen is made of glass.

Although Microsoft has not revealed any specifications for the Surface Duo, the camera is one point where the two-screen phone may lag. The prototype of the device that Microsoft showed had no rear camera, suggesting you may have to use the front-facing camera to take photos. The Galaxy Fold, on the other hand, has six cameras: three on the back, two inside and one on the closed-up front. However, there is a chance Microsoft will add more cameras in the final version of the Surface Duo. Microsoft Chief Product Officer Panos Panay also suggested that the camera may change going ahead, saying it’s still “early days.”

Since the Surface Duo will run on Android, it will support Google’s software for foldable phones. With the larger Surface Neo, Microsoft showed a feature that allowed users to drag an app over both sides of the display. If the same feature comes to the Surface Duo, it would mean one app could be split across two screens, but with a noticeable black seam in the middle. There would be no such distraction with the Galaxy Fold. Although there might be a crease in the Galaxy Fold, it won’t matter much when you are watching a movie, viewing photos or reading an e-book.

In terms of the processor, Samsung’s Galaxy Fold is powered by an unnamed 7nm 64-bit octa-core processor. There is no official information on the processor powering the Surface Duo, but Wired claims the device will be powered by a Snapdragon 855 processor.

For now, these are the only Surface Duo vs Galaxy Fold differences that we are aware of. More information on the Surface Duo is expected to be revealed as we move closer to the launch. Microsoft plans to release the Surface Duo sometime during the holiday season of 2020. The early announcement of the device is meant to give developers enough time to design apps that support the dual screen.




About the Author

Aman Jain
Aman is MBA (Finance) with an experience on both Marketing and Finance side. He has worked as a Risk Analyst for AIR Worldwide, and is currently leading VeRa FinServ, a Financial Research firm. Favorite pastimes include watching science fiction movies, reviewing tech gadgets, playing PC games and cricket. - Email him at amanjain@valuewalk.com