Complete Google Stadia games list releasing at launch

Google has confirmed that it will launch its Stadia cloud-gaming platform on Nov. 19, and we now know that there will be over 30 games available on the platform when it launches. The Google Stadia games list includes big titles like Red Dead Redemption 2 and a variety of other titles.

google stadia games list

Image source: Google

Google Stadia games list

In addition to RDR 2, here’s the full Google Stadia games list:

  • Assassin’s Creed Odyssey
  • Attack on Titan 2: Final Battle
  • Baldur’s Gate 3
  • Borderlands 3
  • Cyberpunk 2077
  • Darksiders Genesis
  • Destiny 2
  • Destroy All Humans
  • Doom (2016)
  • Doom Eternal
  • Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2
  • Farming Simulator 19
  • Final Fantasy 15
  • Football Manager 2020
  • Get Packed
  • Gods & Monsters
  • GRID
  • Gylt
  • Just Dance 2020
  • Kline
  • Marvel’s Avengers
  • Metro Exodus
  • Mortal Kombat 11
  • NBA 2K20
  • Orcs Must Die 3
  • Power Rangers: Battle for the Grid
  • Rage 2
  • Rise of the Tomb Raider
  • Samurai Shodown
  • Shadow of the Tomb Raider
  • Superhot
  • The Crew 2
  • The Elder Scrolls Online
  • Thumper
  • Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Breakpoint
  • Tom Clancy’s The Division 2
  • Tomb Raider Definitive Edition
  • Trials Rising
  • Watch Dogs Legion
  • Windjammers 2
  • Wolfenstein: Youngblood

Of the above Google Stadia games list, three of them are exclusive to the platform. They are Orcs Must Die 3, Get Packed and Gylt. Only Destiny 2 will be included in the Stadia Pro subscription, which will be $10 per month. If Google is going to convince players to sign up for a subscription, it will have to add a lot more games to that list. Thus, we would expect more titles to be added at some point within the next month. For now, the Stadia is more like Steam than Netflix because most of the games must be purchased before they can be streamed and played.

The whole point of the Stadia platform is to make it easier for more players to enjoy video games without spending a lot of money on a console or expensive gaming PC. However, in order to do that successfully, the system will have to prove that it’s able to do what expensive systems can do at a fraction of the price.



About the Author

Michelle Jones
Michelle Jones was a television news producer for eight years. She produced the morning news programs for the NBC affiliates in Evansville, Indiana and Huntsville, Alabama and spent a short time at the CBS affiliate in Huntsville. She has experience as a writer and public relations expert for a wide variety of businesses. Michelle has been with ValueWalk since 2012 and is now our editor-in-chief. Email her at Mjones@valuewalk.com.