Democrat Debates: Green New Deal And Climate Change

After the debates: Questions to ask candidates on the Green New Deal

In the second round of Democratic presidential debates, the main difference between candidates was their level of passion about the “climate crisis.” Moderators asked no probing questions about the evidence for the crisis or the economic consequences of a Green New Deal. Here are some questions that thoughtful reporters should ask:

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  • Where should the $2 trillion proposed by Elizabeth Warren or $400 billion by Joe Biden to research alternative energy be spent? What might the ROI (return on investment in dollars or gigatons  of carbon dioxide saved) be, compared with using the money to build nuclear generating stations? (China can build one for around $3 billion each.)
  • How much will it cost to replace our 260 million gasoline-powered cars with electric cars, or will they just be junked?
  • Exactly how will food get from farm to supermarket without diesel-fueled trucks?
  • What has happened to the price of electricity in green energy leaders such as Germany, Australia, and California, and how does this affect the poor and middle class?
  • Candidates want to keep a “climate denier” out of the White House. What would they do with the 31,000 scientists who signed the Oregon Petition stating that there was NO evidence that atmospheric carbon dioxide was causing catastrophic climate effects?

For further information, see the Climate Change IQ Test or “Green New Deal,” Civil Defense Perspectives, January 2019.

Jane M. Orient, M.D., Tucson, AZ

President, Physicians for Civil Defense



About the Author

Jacob Wolinsky
Jacob Wolinsky is the founder of ValueWalk.com, a popular value investing and hedge fund focused investment website. Prior to ValueWalk, Jacob was VP of Business Development at SumZero. Prior to SumZero, Jacob worked as an equity analyst first at a micro-cap focused private equity firm, followed by a stint at a smid cap focused research shop. Jacob lives with his wife and four kids in Passaic NJ. - Email: jacob(at)valuewalk.com - Twitter username: JacobWolinsky - Full Disclosure: I do not purchase any equities anymore to avoid even the appearance of a conflict of interest and because at times I may receive grey areas of insider information. I have a few existing holdings from years ago, but I have sold off most of the equities and now only purchase mutual funds and some ETFs. I also own a few grams of Gold and Silver