May’s Windows 10 Update To Squeeze More Of Your PC’s Storage

May's Windows 10 Update

Image Source: Vikas Shukla / Valuewalk

Every now and then Microsoft issues a new update for Windows 10 to fix known bugs and add new features. However, May’s Windows 10 update might enrage some users, given that it requires twice as much space as previous updates. Those running low on disk space or using a low-storage solid-state drive should reconsider upgrading or removing some content from their PC.

Microsoft announced that the May update will be version 1903. Instead of the typical amount of space required for installation, it will require 32 GB. That is twice as much as the 32-bit version 1809, which required only 16 GB of storage. May’s Windows 10 update applies the same storage rules to both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows and all versions of Home, Pro, and Enterprise.

This shouldn’t be a problem for high-end laptops and desktops, which can have over 2 TB of storage, and PCs with high-end solid-state drives. However, users with older machines may experience major headaches. Some older machines have as little as 256 GB or even 128 GB solid-state drives. They will have only enough space to install the operating system and a small selection of programs without throttling them.

May’s Windows 10 update may even be a nightmare for those with computers with more storage, as many who use a lot of space are gamers. Others run intensive programs which require fast reading and writing from storage, so more storage is required for such programs.

May’s Windows 10 update is coming soon, so if you find yourself running low on disk space, you should consider upgrading to a larger solid-state drive. Skipping the update is also not an option, given that Microsoft uses the updates to improve the overall Windows 10 experience and patch vulnerabilities that could lead to cyber-attacks and data breaches.

Microsoft was facing some problems with its updates in the past. The October update came with various issues which required the company to pull the patch twice, causing many users to lose their data.




About the Author

Danica Simic
Danica Simic has been writing ever since she was a child. Before she started writing for ValueWalk she was reviewing laptops, headphones and gaming equipment as well as writing articles about astronomy and game development. Danica is a student of applied and computational physics while also studying software and data engineering. Her hobbies include reading, swimming, drawing and gaming whenever she has free time. - Email her at dsimic@valuewalk.com