Politics

Let’s Let The F.B.I. Do Some Investigating

When the Senate votes – or doesn’t vote – on Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination, it either will make a terrible mistake or it won’t. Only three people will know for sure. They are the teenagers who were or weren’t in a room together one summer night some thirty-six years ago – Brett Kavanaugh, his close friend, Mark Judge, and the woman who is accusing Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her, Christine Blasey.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh Blasey
By U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Each of them surely remembers if she or he was in that room, and if so, whether or not seventeen-year-old Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted fifteen-year-old Christine Blasey, while Mark Judge looked on.

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Three other acquaintances who Blasey believed were at the party don’t remember being there. Of course, since they attended many such social events during their high school years, it’s easy to forget what, for them, was just another not very memorable party.

In her detailed and emotional testimony on Thursday before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Blasey provided a vivid description of what took place in that upstairs bedroom. Kavanaugh testified that not only was it highly unlikely that he even attended a such a party, but that he never assaulted Blasey or any other woman.

Blasey had insisted on making an F.B.I. investigation a precondition for her appearing before the committee. But when the Republican majority refused to meet her demand, she then agreed to appear without that investigation.

Kavanaugh, who had often stressed how important it was to clear his good name, repeatedly refused to demand an investigation by the F.B.I. He did not even insist that his long-time friend, Mark Judge, be compelled to testify.

One would think that not just the Republican majority on the Judiciary Committee -- but Mr. Kavanaugh, who bitterly complained about how the nomination process had soiled his reputation -- would welcome an F.B.I. investigation, which might actually uncover the truth as to what had actually happened that fateful evening in 1982.

Maybe some old friends or schoolmates would recall having heard something about this incident. Possibly, even Mark Judge, who has refused to voluntarily testify, might have a change of heart.

Doesn’t the United States Senate, and much more importantly, the American people, want every effort to be made to determine just what did happen? One would think that everyone would want to learn the truth.

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