Technology

Galaxy S9 Plus Users Now Reporting Low Notification Sound Issue

Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus notification sound
Image Source: Samsung.com (screenshot)

Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus was launched among much fanfare, but users have been reporting some issues with the phone since the launch. Recently, users have started to complain about the low notification sound issue. According to the users, the notification sound coming from their device is not loud enough and is hardly audible despite being set at the highest setting.

On a Samsung forum, one user said the sound is just fine while selecting it in the respective app settings. However, when a notification pops up, it is like the speakers are covered with something despite all sliders at the maximum volume. Some users also point out that the low notification sound issue could be arising due to the sound coming only from the bottom speaker of the phone.

While for some it is just the notification sound not being audible enough, some are even reporting a similar issue with the ringtones. The notification sound issue comes on the heels of call drop issues that users started reporting right after the launch of the Galaxy S9 Plus. At the time, several users reported call drops and muting during calls.

Samsung’s latest S-line of phones is among the most expensive and high end tech smartphones available in the market. And, for users spending that kind of money on the phone, facing issues now and then can be frustrating. Realizing this, the South Korean smartphone maker was quick to take note of the call drops and mute issue, and rolled out a patch to fix it.

Keeping aside such issues, Samsung’s latest flagships boast impressive specs. With the Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9 Plus, Samsung has delivered the fastest smartphones, outpacing even the iPhone X and Pixel 2. Samsung’s latest flagships boast a download speed of up to 42% faster than the closest rival by Apple, in addition to the long-lasting battery and more storage. According to the leading mobile data speed analyst – Ookla – the Galaxy S9 and S9 Plus achieves 37% faster download speed than the iPhone X, 17% faster than the Pixel 2 and 38% faster than the Galaxy S7.

Justin Denison, Samsung America’s Senior Vice President of Mobile Product Strategy and Marketing, said the company is “constantly innovating and developing products that set the new standard for the industry. Our Galaxy owners never need to worry about whether they’re getting the best possible experience from their phone.”

Further, Samsung’s flagships also sport several high-performance features. It has a dual aperture camera, long-lasting battery, IP68 water and dust resistance and capacity to expand the storage up to four times. Samsung claims that the S9 and S9 Plus are the best phones for sharing and sending photos to friends, loading up TV shows and movies for a long plane journey and so on.

Talking of the sales numbers, at its home turf, the Galaxy S9 and S9 Plus have already crossed the one million mark, the Korean firm revealed last week. From its launch date, the flagships took around just two months to cross the million mark. In comparison, the Galaxy S8 series crossed the same milestone in just thirty-seven days.

Samsung has not revealed the global sales numbers. However, the company recently added two new shades – Sunrise Gold and Burgundy Red – to boost the sales further. Separately, a report late last month revealed alarming sales numbers of the latest flagships citing not so encouraging numbers from three major carriers – SK Telecom, KT and LG Uplus.

Many believe that slowing sales does not seem like a one-time event, and could turn into a long-term trend in the market. Industry experts believe that skyrocketing prices with no innovative features are making high-end smartphones a bad bet for consumers. However, this is not stopping Samsung from promoting its flagships by taking digs at the iPhones.

A recent Samsung advertisement took a dig at Apple over the throttling controversy in old iPhones. The ad shows a woman trying to present her boarding pass and all of a sudden the battery blacks out, while the other passenger with the Galaxy S9 walks through. In another shot, a passenger is shown trying to load TV shows onto the iPhone, but fails. On the other hand, her seatmate with a Galaxy S9 is shown enjoying the show in high-definition.

Some of the viewers were not happy with the ad claiming Samsung is comparing its latest flagship to an iPhone, which is almost four years old. Another pointed out that the battery issue could be easily fixed for just $30. The thing is, Samsung might stand to lose more by indulging in such cheap publicity if it fails to address the issues that its flagships are grappling with.