Science

Flat-Earther: Water Weight Variation Proves That Gravity Does Not Exist

Flat Earther Gravity Water

Centrifugal force at the perimeter of the object is determined by how fast the perimeter is traveling and the diameter of the object. For the earth, the centrifugal force is variable as to its diameter; its latitude location.  In Dallas, Texas latitude 32.7767° the speed of rotation is 863.8 mph compared to 537.4 mph at Olympia, Washington latitude 47.0379° N.  These different earth rotation speeds of 863.8 mph and 537.4 mph generate a different centrifugal force on an object.  In our case, the object is one gallon of water that appears to weigh 8.34 pounds per gallon both in Dallas, Texas and Olympia, Washington.

In fact, one gallon of water appears to have the same static weight as it runs in a river from north to south across multiple earth diameters (180° of latitudes) and earth’s corresponding multiple rotation speeds.  The standard weight of one US liquid gallon of water is about 8.34 pounds at 62° F.  There is no adjustment for the weight of water as to its latitude location.  Apparently, gravity makes this adjustment for weights and measures.

If one were to believe the conclusion that gravity makes an adjustment for weights and measures to be accurate and that the conclusion can be proven to be true then you have a fact.  Otherwise, if there is some other factor(s) that causes one gallon of water at 62° F to be 8.34 lbs. but it cannot be proven, then you have a theory.  Is the theory about how to calculate centrifugal force, or is the theory about whether the earth rotates 360° in a 24 hour time frame?

This is quickly becoming complicated.  At what latitude is the one gallon of water at 8.34 pounds at 62° F determined?  It has to be dead center of the North or South Pole where there is no centrifugal force.  At dead center of the poles, there is no diameter or travel speed to consider for the math components of centrifugal force.  For the math of Centrifugal Pounds Force, a gallon of water in Olympia, Washington is 12.415 lbs. as opposed to Dallas, Texas at 19.915 lbs. Otherwise, gravity has made all of the math work out to be that water weight is 8.34 lbs. per gallon regardless of its location in lakes, ponds, and rivers running from the north to the south.

Nikola Tesla explains the preceding conflicts as follows:

“Today’s scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality.”

It is time well spent to study Nikola Tesla (July 10, 1856 to January 7, 1943), one would discover the expanse of his technology that has been suppressed.

There are “Earth does not move experiments”:  The Michelson–Morley experiment was performed over the spring and summer of 1887 by Albert A. Michelson and Edward W. Morley …an attempt to detect the relative motion of matter through the stationary luminiferous aether (“aether wind”). The result was negative…the direction of movement through the presumed aether, and the speed at right angles, was found not to exist; this result…eventually led to special relativity, which rules out a stationary aether. The experiment has been referred to as “the moving-off point for the theoretical aspects of the Second Scientific Revolution”.  Michelson–Morley type experiments have been repeated many times with steadily increasing sensitivity…recent optical resonator experiments confirmed the absence of any aether wind at the 1017 level.

Science cannot be wrong, there surely must be an equation that resolves the conundrum that gravity makes one gallon of water weight be 8.34 lbs. per gallon regardless that earth’s multiple, surface speeds range from 1040 mph at the equator to zero mph at the poles.

Article by Kert Moore

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