Science

Flat-Earthers Latest Theory Claims Gravity Isn’t Real And The Big Bang Is Fake

flat earth theory
Image source: YouTube Video Screenshot

A new Flat Earth theory from the recent UK convention asserts that gravity isn’t real – adding yet another explanation for why these theorists think science may be wrong.

The idea of a Flat Earth theory is certainly controversial, as it flies in the face of everything we know and understand about science. There have been people in outer space who have seen firsthand that our planet is round, and we have mountains of evidence that our planet is a sphere rather than a flat disk, but that doesn’t keep a number of people from embracing the Flat Earth theory – with a large number of believers gathering at the Flat Earth convention in the UK this past weekend.

During this conference, Flat Earth theorists presented a number of their findings and suggestions, and Dave Marsh – one of the conference attendees – insists that he’s debunked one of the main facets of our planet and existence: gravity.

“My research destroys big bang cosmology…It supports the idea that gravity doesn’t exist and the only true force in nature is electromagnetism.”

In the presentation he made regarding his Flat Earth theory, he states that he managed to disprove planetary motion using a Nikon camera and an app from his back garden – according to the Telegraph. Many are obviously skeptical about Marsh’s Flat Earth theory and the suggestion that gravity doesn’t exist, but that didn’t keep him from charging full speed ahead with an announcement at the recent convention.

The leading Flat Earth theory believes that Earth is a disc rather than a sphere, with the Arctic Circle at the center and Antarctica making up a 150-foot-tall wall of ice around the rim.

The Flat Earth convention was as much as a social affair and opportunity for businesses as it was a collection of like-minded individuals, with delegates buying and selling flat earth merchandise such as “Flat Power” T-shirts, novelty spirit levels, and flat maps. One of the most attended events was a Flat Earth theory discussion about what shape the Earth actually takes.

While Flat Earth theorists agree that the Earth isn’t round like the majority of the population thinks, they do disagree what shape it actually does take. While some took to arguing that the Earth is a flat disc like we discussed above, others insisted that it has a domed roof instead.

Darren Nesbit is a Bolton-based dance musician, and he suggested that the Earth is diamond-shaped and supported by pillars.

“I’m not saying this is definitely what is going on, but I think it is a plausible model,” he said.

Despite a ton of evidence from organizations like NASA who have proven that the Earth is round using satellites, GPS, and images taken from space, those who believe in the Flat Earth theory are convinced the agencies are lying – calling the accepted science “round Earth conspiracy” and suggesting that it was orchestrated by NASA and other government agencies to deceive the public.

While most believe that the Flat Earth theory is bogus, there are a number of high-profile figures that believe in the theory. It’s important to note that the major proponents of a Flat Earth theory are nearly entirely non-scientists – bringing into question how valid their claims that the Earth isn’t round actually are.

Former England cricketer Freddie Flintoff revealed last year that he was listening to a podcast called “Flat Earthers” – a show which he found incredibly convincing.

“If you’re in a helicopter and you hover why does the Earth not come to you if it’s round?

“Why, if we’re hurtling through space, why would water stay still? Why is it not wobbling?

“Also if you fire a laser about 16 miles, if the world was curved, you shouldn’t be able to see it but you can.”

Regardless of any Flat Earth theory that comes out of the convention, it’s going to take a lot more than speculation to convince scientists and the general public that gravity isn’t real.