Warren Buffett’s contracting philosophy and practices

In a centuries-old debate among contracts scholars, one group supports a presumption favoring a text-centered approach to the interpretation of a written agreement — the plain meaning taken from the four corners — while opponents urge a broader understanding of context — what the parties intended and the circumstances of their negotiation. The contending positions have so hardened that, in a jarring juxtaposition my new Essay will reveal, recent academic classifications of the same state laws are exactly opposite to each other: contextualists classify certain states as contextualist that textualists say are textualist!

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Yet despite the persistence of acute polarization, the author also documents — and applauds — promising trends in the literature toward hybridization and compromise, a search for factors to guide the selection of interpretive tools rather than putting some off limits or setting up default rule presumptions. While scholars have thus long obscured a common-sense reality, a new wave of research is making it clearer to all sides that text and context are both useful, depending on the details of different jobs.

More modern, advanced, and sensible, this new view of contract interpretation replaces a stubborn “winner-take-all” approach to the debate with a flexible and practical “best-tool-for-the-job” approach. To illuminate its importance and value — call it contract interpretation 2.0 — my new Essay turns to Warren Buffett’s contracting philosophy and practices. The famous investor and businessman is also a polyglot teacher, and his approach to contracts, especially acquisition agreements and employment arrangements, illustrates the imperative of using the right tool for the job.

Article by Lawrence Cunningham, Concurring Opinions

 

See

Cunningham, Lawrence A., Contract Interpretation 2.0: Not Winner-Take-All But Best-Tool-For-The-Job (2018). 85 Geo. Wash. L. Rev. 1625 (2018); GWU Law School Public Law Research Paper No. 2018-09; GWU Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2018-09. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3140079

More modern, advanced, and sensible, this new view of contract interpretation replaces a stubborn “winner-take-all” approach to the debate with a flexible and practical “best-tool-for-the-job” approach. To illuminate its importance and value — call it contract interpretation 2.0 — this Essay turns to Warren Buffett’s contracting philosophy and practices. The famous investor and businessman is also a polyglot teacher, and his approach to contracts, especially acquisition agreements and employment arrangements, illustrates the imperative of using the right tool for the job.

 

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Larry is a professor of law at the George Washington University Law School. He joined the GW Law School faculty in 2007, having previously taught for 6 years at Boston College (where he served a 2-year term as Academic Dean) and for 8 years at Cardozo (where he served a 5-year term as Director of the Heyman Center on Corporate Governance). He also taught courses at many other schools in the US and abroad, including Central European University, Columbia University, Hebrew University, University of Navarra, and Vanderbilt University. Before entering academia, he practiced corporate law for 4 years at Cravath, Swaine & Moore. He earned his BA from University of Delaware and his JD magna cum laude from Cardozo. Larry writes extensively in corporate and securities law, with a special emphasis on law and accounting and investor perspectives. He teaches courses in those fields as well as Contracts. He has published a dozen books and 50 law review articles. His recent books include: Contracts in the Real World: Stories of Popular Contracts and Why They Matter (Cambridge University Press 2012), The AIG Story (Wiley 2013), The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America (Carolina Academic Press 2013), and Berkshire Hathaway’s Value of Values (Columbia University Press 2014). Areas of Interest: Accounting, Auditing, Contracts, Corporate Law, Finance, Investing, Legal Education, Securities Regulation