Technology

Slow Charging Times With The Google Pixel 2 XL

Google has been the subject of slow charging times on their devices, and with the Google Pixel 2 XL slow charging problem surfacing this week, Google faces further scrutiny which isn’t good for their reputation. There is reason to believe the charging issue with the Pixel 2 XL relates to the device’s inability to utilize the charger’s full capabilities, where it doesn’t pull enough power to charge sufficiently.

Google Pixel 2 XL slow charging problem

The Google Pixel 2 XL has been regarded as a highly impressive smartphone with a fantastic camera, comprising features including a top-notch design and waterproofing. The smart software used is flexible, meaning it can update in line with technological advancements, and the handset’s point of differentiation is the camera. The Pixel 2 XL is Google trying to marry its software and hardware efforts, and it is living proof of how far Google have come in the smartphone market over the past few years.

The new Google Lens and Pixel Launcher feature are highly appealing, and many consider the model to be Google’s best phone yet. It meets user requirements in terms of functionality, and is aesthetically pleasing, creating the best of both world’s handset with a bespoke appeal. The Google Pixel 2 XL has a slim display that incorporates bezels for ease of use, and the vibrant, razor-sharp pixel density of the display is useful for VR. Without question, the handset’s marquee feature is its camera, which has a 12.2MP camera lens on the back that sports an f/1.8 aperture.

Despite otherwise favorable reviews, the Google Pixel 2 XL slow charging problem has been acknowledged by users across the globe, creating unfavorable negative attention. The Google Pixel 2 XL is powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835, renowned for shortening the charging time of smartphones. This perception has been brought into question with the current Google Pixel 2 XL slow charging problem, which seems exclusive to the Pixel 2 XL.

To explore the issue in question, analysis was conducted recently to evaluate the charging problems. Tests run on the Pixel 2 XL revealed the wattage the Pixel 2 XL draws from the charger starts at 15W, before falling to 10.5W after just a few minutes. This is contrary to Google’s claims, which outline the Pixel 2 XL can charge the device with up to 18W of current. The wattage was shown to drop even further after an hour, and the charging time for the Pixel 2 XL is close to three hours. This has understandably frustrated consumers, who expect significantly faster charging times for the money.

Despite negativity surrounding this discovery, some suggest Google has deliberately avoided putting too much stress on the Pixel 2 XL battery, hoping it will last longer and prioritize durability over performance. Though the issue isn’t too severe, consumers certainly didn’t expect to face difficulties when charging the device, and consumer expectations haven’t been met since the phone was marketed as fast-charging.

There doesn’t seem any fixes for the Google Pixel 2 XL slow charging problem, but whether this news will have a serious impact on sales remains to be seen. Perhaps Google now regret rejecting their muskie concept, which eventually became the HTC U11 Plus. The Pixel 2 XL we see today is actually a third model made by LG and named by Taimen, but was this a mistake? The company hasn’t released an official statement, but it isn’t beyond the realm of possibility regret is sinking in.

There have been other issues associated with the Pixel 2 XL, including burn-in problems with the display, and these have manifested into separate complaints that are interlinked. Users reported dead pixels on their displays, green lines, and even poor audio quality when recording videos. Alongside the Android Auto crashing randomly on the odd occasion, it seems Google have much explaining to do, as they’re still in the process of finding their feet in the smartphone market.

I hope you have found this article on the Google Pixel 2 XL slow charging problem informative, and appreciate us bringing the issue to your attention. The content is especially useful for people who own the phone, or who were thinking of buying the handset and are now better informed to choose whether it’s right for them. If you would like to contribute to the conversation, or have any queries, please comment below to kick-start the discussion.