Supply of the Nintendo Switch has been an issue ever since the launch of the console. Time and time again, the Japanese console maker has assured fans that it will ramp up Nintendo Switch production. Now as we approach the holiday season, the company has again assured fans that there will be no scant supply during the holiday season.

Nintendo Switch production
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Switch supply falling short of demand

In a statement to the WSJ, the Switch maker assured fans and potential buyers that it is doing everything it can to make sure there is no dearth of the consoles during the holiday shopping season.

“We’re doing everything we can to make sure everyone who wants to buy a Nintendo Switch system can do so. We will ramp up production for the holiday period, which has been factored into our forecast,” the console maker said.

Supply is running short not just in Japan, but fans in the United States are also waiting for supply of the Switch to ramp up. Some enthusiasts have been trying to get the console for months now. Retailers such as Wal-Mart, GameStop and Target have already stated that they do not have sufficient units to meet demand.

Europe seems to be doing slightly better, with certain retailers in Germany, France and Italy showing the console as available. In June, however, British videogame retailer Game Digital was not happy, stating that it has been receiving a lower-than-expected Switch supply, which in turn will hit its profitability, reports FoxBusiness.

Nintendo has shipped nearly 4.7 million units, and more recently, things have improved at retailers such as GameStop, notes Comicbook. At retail stores, fans can select from eight Nintendo Switch bundles starting at $389.99. All the bundles are available for under $400 on the online store.

Nintendo Switch production issues

The Switch quickly became Nintendo’s flagship console and a much-needed way out for the company after the Wii U failed to impress gamers and families. Nintendo maintains that the Switch shortages are “definitely not intentional” but are just the outcome of underestimating demand. There have been reports that Nintendo is facing issues with some components which are used in both the Switch and the iPhone 8, which is believed to be set for release next month.

The Nintendo Switch might also bear the brunt of the financial problems brewing at Japan Display, the sole supplier of displays for the Switch consoles. If those financial problems continue to persist, Switch supply might become further delayed and scant.

By the end of the fiscal year, Nintendo hopes to provide retailers nearly 10 million Switch systems. This figure could even reach up to 18 million if the supply chain supports it. An employee in the supply chain told the WSJ that their company is ready to up the pace of Nintendo Switch production when asked.

Nintendo is very hopeful about its hybrid console and expects the installed base to reach 100 million units.

“The truth is we want to raise the installed base of Nintendo Switch up to the same level as Wii,” the console maker said.

Nintendo also expects that there will be some households with more than one Switch console.