iPhone 8 May Notify You About Screen Cracks [REPORT]

Apple made its iPhone tough, and the newest models have a greater ability to survive accidental drops. However, this does not mean that the display is unbreakable. No matter how careful you are, accidental drops may lead to cracks on the screen. Now Apple has come up with a new invention to help you overcome this fear.

Apple iPhone 7
Photo by kropekk_pl (Pixabay)

iPhone already has technology to detect a crack

To keep users informed when the screen is about to crack (so that they know when a replacement is needed) the company has made a new invention to help them discover microscopic hairline cracks. Such a technology could come in very handy, as it not just detects finer cracks that could evolve into something more serious but can also help Apple create sturdier iPhone screens.

On Thursday, a new patent application was published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The patent (first spotted by AppleInsider) is titled “Coverglass Fracture Detection” and details a technology capable of detecting any kind of screen cracks.

Cracks on iPhone screens can be detected with the help of already-existing technologies inside the device, revealed the patent application. Changes in the integrity of the glass following an impact can be detected as well with the help of sensors placed underneath the glass protection in the iPhone’s display, notes BGR.

A particular layer of light-based sensors can also be added to the screen to assess the integrity of the glass using light transmission. If a sudden deceleration consistent with a fall is registered, then other phone sensors such as accelerometers and proximity sensors could trigger a detection mechanism.

Apple may use data to make sturdier screens

According to the patent, the technology is capable of distinguishing between hairline cracks and spiderweb cracks. It could also measure the length, depth, width and expansion rate of the fracture. Users will get notifications which could include pinpointing the area of damage and alerts about ancillary damage to internal components caused by the impact.

Users may also be asked to confirm the location of cracks onscreen by circling the area with their finger. A timeline of events leading up to the crack is generated after the diagnostic information is corralled, notes MacRumors. This might help in repair work. Apple might use the data to understand how and when cracks most commonly occur. This will help designers create displays that are more resistant to breaks.