Intel held its CES press event inside virtual reality, offering more than 260 VR units for all the press representatives attending the event. CEO Brian Krzanich showed off several live events in virtual reality. The chip maker started preparation for this VR setup even before Christmas, running miles of wire through the press room in doing so, reports VentureBeat.

Intel
Intel by Roebot, Flickr

First of its kind at CES

At this year’s CES, the chip maker demonstrated strong tech support and said that individuals could take the headset off if it made him dizzy or disoriented. This is the first time any company has showcased this technology at CES, although companies have done this at various other events. Nokia conducted a press event in VR when it launched its Ozo Vr camera, says VentureBeat.

Intel spokeswoman Laura Anderson said, “This is the most technically difficult event we have ever done.”

Krzanich, told the gathering, “We want to show you the future of this technology. What is driving this technology?”

As expected, the answer was Moore’s Law. Intel’s CEO said that Moore’s Law is relevant, and Intel has operational chips that are built with a 10-nanometer process. Krzanich said that the chip maker is looking to ship 10 million chips by the end of 2017.

In the first VR demo, Krzanich displayed what it is like to jump off a cliff and parachute through a desert valley. The second VR demonstration showed a waterfall in Vietnam, with every frame having 3 gigabytes of video data, notes VentureBeat.

Intel showcases Project Alloy

Intel has been making big announcements at CES. In previous years, Krzanich has had BMX cyclists on stage, drones and a big floating whale in augmented reality. This year, the chip maker showcased the first version of its Project Alloy headset – a new wearable computer combination of virtual reality mixed with augmented reality.

It will start to ship in the fourth quarter, according to the announcement. The shipping time comes quick, as the project was announced only in August 2015, says TechCrunch.

Intel is looking to build a niche for itself in the VR area as it moves ahead and expands into advanced computing, moving away from legacy areas like the PC. The chip maker has not said a word about the pricing for the product, and neither has it clarified whether the device will be a developer model or a full-fledged consumer product

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