Tesla is voluntarily recalling about 7,000 charging adapters for its electric vehicles. This move follows two reports of overheating that resulted in melted plastic on the plugs, according to Bloomberg. This rarely-used charging adapter is sold through Tesla’s online store. International consumers are not affected by this recall.

Tesla Recalls 7,000 Charging Adapters After Two Reports Of Overheating
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Tesla recalls chargers based on two reports of overheating

According to an email sent to owners of the chargers on Tuesday, two customers reported overheating in November. No damage other than the melted plastic on the plugs was reported. The electric car maker said it notified U.S. regulators of its voluntary recall. An outside supplier manufactured the accessories, and according to the electric car making giant, the accessories have not been sold for at least six months.

The two reports of overheating involved the NEMA 14-30 adapters that are sometimes used to charge Tesla cars via clothes dryer appliance outlets in U.S. homes. Replacements will be shipped starting in the next few weeks, notes Bloomberg. Tesla, in the meantime, asks consumers to avoid using the equipment if possible.

Tesla will replace the recalled chargers with NEMA 6-50 and NEMA 10-30 adapters, as they have the same design. The recall process will take about three months. According to EV firm, consumers who depend on these adapters may continue to use them, as there have not been any reported instances of overheating in these versions.

Tesla is not recalling the NEMA 5-14 and 14-50 adapters. In addition, the Universal Mobile Connector or the standard Tesla Wall Connector is not affected by the recall.  Consumers can always charge their vehicles using the fast Supercharger system or the slow and steady method of a 120-volt outlet, says CNET.

You can visit Tesla’s website to learn about the affected adapters.

Tesla’s fifth recall since 2012

This is Tesla’s fifth recall since it started delivering the Model S in 2012, but it is the first time that the automaker is recalling an accessory, notes Bloomberg. In its biggest recall a year ago, the EV firm recalled all 90,000 Model S cars on the road because of a single report of a front seatbelt not connecting properly. The company recalled less than 3,000 Model X SUVs in April due to issues with its third-row seats.

In the U.S. car industry, recalls of products are not new. According to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA), a record number of recalls involving more than 50 million vehicles took place last year.

On Tuesday, Tesla shares closed down 0.51% at $185.85.