Uber but for – We’re so used to opening an app on our phones and having things delivered. It’s so common now, that it may be hard to remember what life was like without the convenience of on-demand services. However, Uber, which sparked the wave of on-demand services, has only been around since 2009, just two short years after the iPhone was introduced.

Since it launched in San Francisco (unsurprisingly where many of these on-demand apps get their start), it has expanded to cities all across the United States, as well as 50 countries worldwide. Uber has also received almost $9 billion dollars in funding. Because of it’s success, other startups were quick to join the on-demand model bandwagon.

According to MarketWatch, who analyzed 477,358 startup pitches Uber was the second most common company comparison that startups used — Airbnb was the first. This is no surprise given how so many industries have adopted some kind of on-demand model.

To show you just how vast this phenomenon is, GetVoIP put together a chart on 49 on-demand startups. Most are only available in select cities in the US — San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles being three of the most common. The company with the highest funding, Enjoy, an on-demand delivery service for tech products, received $80 million — not even close to Uber’s nearly $9 billion.

Though some argue that the on-demand model is oversaturated and that Uber is a unicorn, these companies are evolving to cater to customer needs in new ways like by adding subscription services on top of on-demand services.

It doesn’t seem like investors have lost faith in them yet. About half the companies on the list of 49 have been funded in the past year. Two — Heal and EatStreet — have been funded in the past month. It seems that the on-demand model is still evolving and experimenting to see what works best, and only time will tell where on-demand will flourish and where it will fail.

Uber but for full infographic below

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Uber but for
Uber but for

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