Whether you’re an Android or Apple’s iOS user, you likely have a few factory apps that you would rather not have cluttering up your phone, apps that you simply don’t use.

Apple Remove Stock Apps

It’s my phone and I don’t want it, c’mon Apple/Google

Stock apps like Apple’s actual “Stocks” app comes to mind. While I have plenty of space on my iPhone I live in a dangerous country and like to have a cheap Android phone to toss to potential thieves. That’s just smart, but given it’s small internal storage options, operating systems that get bigger with each new release and all those stock apps, It’s utility is almost throwing at that hypothetical mugger and fighting for the cash I’m sure he also wants.

And then there are those silly Motorola apps (on my phone) and other manufacturers’ app suites that take up even more space that I’ve never used once.

Apple announced today that this might soon be a thing of the past. They seem to get it.

With all those free weather options why would I want Apple’s? If you’re really trading stocks, is Apple’s Stocks doing it for you?

Not that easy to get rid of apparently

While it’s easy to get rid of third-party apps, stock apps are generally relegated to a folder called “Stuff from Apple I don’t need.” This is where Compass goes.

But ahead of Apple’s annual Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference this could finally change.

Tim Cook did, however, take the time to explain why you’ve been stuck with them.

“This is a more complex issue than it first appears,” Cook explained. “There are some apps that are linked to something else on the iPhone. If they were to be removed they might cause issues elsewhere on the phone. There are other apps that aren’t like that. So over time, I think with the ones that aren’t like that, we’ll figure out a way [for you to remove them]. … It’s not that we want to suck up your real estate; we’re not motivated to do that. We want you to be happy. So I recognize that some people want to do this, and it’s something we’re looking at.” 

At some point, the customer is always right, and it appears as if Cook knows this.