The new camera looks set to revolutionize the shooting of full color video in low light.

The MH20F-SH camera may not have the most catchy name, but it’s an amazing piece of kit. Thanks to a novel sensor, it is capable of shooting full high-definition color video even when light levels are extremely low, writes Michael Hession for Gizmodo.

Canon Reveals Camera That Sees Better In The Dark Than You

Huge pixels allow full color filming in low light

These capabilities are due to the inclusion of a full-frame sensor with 2.26 megapixels. Although that resolution may seem dreadfully low compared to other cameras, that is because each pixel is huge. At 19 microns, each pixel is 7.5 times larger than those found on Canon’s 1Dx DSLR camera.

Large pixels can capture a lot of light, and the MH20F-SH sensor reaches 4,000,000 ISO. By way of comparison, that means the camera has better night-vision than you do, and that’s without infrared technology.

The camera records 1080p color video at 24, 30 or 60 frames per second, but there is currently no sample footage available. Canon has said that the camera is meant for “industrial” use and the price tag of $30,000 will put it out of reach for most consumers.

It is not entirely clear what “industrial” uses the company has in mind, but Canon did mention nighttime surveillance and wildlife documentaries. At 4 x 4 x 4 inches, the small size of the camera means that it could be easily used in many situations.

Canon striving to prove it still innovates

One motivation for the release of the camera may be to ward off criticism that Canon has stopped innovating. Camera enthusiasts have deplored the fact that the company has stopped introducing new features in its devices.

However the introduction of a hugely expensive new camera designed for a very specific purpose does not seem like the best way to win over the average consumer. For those willing to drop a serious chunk of change in return for the ability to film at night, the camera looks set to be a game-changer when it ships in December.

For the rest of us, it looks like we will have to wait and watch the presumably amazing footage that it can capture.