Twitter wants the best content to reach its users and is providing them with a new tool that will help them discover it. The existing tool used for the purpose, “Discover,” is being retired by the company, according to an announcement made by the company on Wednesday.

Twitter Brings In Trending Topics To Replace Discover Tool

Interface similar to that of Facebook’s

This new feature will soon be available on the mobile app. Trending topics will be highlighted with this feature, offering users tweets that interest them in a time frame when they are usable.

The search page of the app will offer the user a list of trending topics and a mini description below the heading next to the news feed in a way similar to how it appears on Facebook. This could be beneficial as some hashtags are a bit too vague to understand. Twitter is also planning to show how a tweet is faring, that is, the number of tweets sent in relation with a trend will be tracked, and the traction gained or lost will also be monitored.

Twitter ‘Discover’ no more relevant

 In 2011, Twitter introduced Discover Timeline under the leadership of the co-founder and former CEO Jack Dorsey, who joined the company for a short stint to redirect the product vision. The Timeline was introduced for the purpose of presenting interesting content to users in an easy manner. The results presented to the user by this semi-tailored feature were shortlisted on certain criteria, such as the accounts followed by the user and the accounts followed by those people. The shortlisted topics were displayed on the top of the timeline feature in the form of hashtags. The shortcoming with the feature was that the direction in which topics were trending was hard to determine. There were a few unsatisfied users who complained of irrelevant content featured by the Discover feature.

On all iOS and Android devices in the U.S., the new mobile trends feature from Twitter will be available for download. Twitter.com might soon have all these features too, as the company is still in the experimentation phase.