North Korea warned the United States Ambassador to South Korea that he could suffer a “bigger mishap” than the knife attack on his face last month if he does not stop his insults and laughable accusations, according to Reuters.

North Korea Warns U.S. Envoy Of Bigger Mishap Than A Knife Attack

The warning came from North Korea’s propaganda unit, the Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea in response to the statement of U.S. Envoy Mark Lippert.

During a speech on Wednesday, Lippert said North Korea will be rewarded with prosperity and better relationships with the outside world including the United States if it will improve its human rights record, and take steps to end its nuclear program.

The Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea said, “Lippert needs to drop the bad habit of rashly engaging in scheming chatter distorting the truth and instigating war by taking issue with us.  Otherwise, next time, he could face a bigger mishap than getting cut in the cheek by a South Korean citizen.”

According to the Committee, Lippert’s insult and mockery against North Korea are unbearable, and it cannot overlook his laughable and brazen accusations against the country.

South Korean man assaulted Lippert

A South Korean man with a history of erratic behavior slashed the face of Lippert with a fruit knife during a breakfast forum in Seoul last month. The U.S. Envoy also suffered injuries to his arm. The U.S. Embassy in South Korea confirmed and condemned the assault.

The person who attacked Lippert was charged with attempted murder by the police in South Korea. Authorities questioned the attacker multiple times and concluded that he has no record of any crime related to North Korea.

North Korea previously commented that Lippert deserved the assault but denied any role in the incident.

The North frequently rails at the United States, the South’s biggest ally, accusing it of preparing for imminent invasion.

North Korea warned of merciless strikes on U.S., South Korea

North Korea warned that merciless strikes could be the only way to deal with the aggression of the United States and its allies.

Last month, North Korea fired two, short ranged missiles of its eastern coast as an “armed protest” against the joint military exercises between the United States and South Korea.

Pyongyang slammed the activity as provocative and a preparation for war. It said,

“The situation on the Korean Peninsula is again inching close the brink of a war. The only means to cope with the aggression and war by the U.S. imperialists, and their followers are neither dialogue nor peace. They should be dealt with only by merciless strikes.”

North Korean President Kim Jong-un ordered the country’s military to be fully prepared for war prior to the joint military exercises. He supervised military drills near South Korean borders.

North Korea’s military power

North Korea’s founding and ruling political party emphasized that it is imperative for the country to develop accurate, powerful, and cutting-edge military hardware to be able to cope with modern warfare. The communist country said it will take every measure to show its military power as long as it perceives persisting threats from the United States.

Admiral Bill Gortney, the commander of the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) recently stated that North Korea is capable of putting a miniaturized nuclear warhead on its KN-08 ballistic missile. Theoretically, the missile could reach the U.S.

Gortney said the U.S. should be prepared in case of a nuclear strike from the communist country.  He emphasized that the United States military had the ability to intercept any nuclear strike from North Korea.

“Should one get airborne and come at us I’m confident we would be able to knock it down,” he said.

It was reported that Russia entered into negotiations with North Korea and other countries to conduct joint military exercises. Both countries are strengthening their business and military relationship. The North Korean leader is scheduled to visit Russia on May 9.

Source: Reuters