Tonight’s “Studio 1.0” hosted by Bloomberg Television‘s Emily Chang (@EmilyChangTV) features Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. In a wide-ranging interview, Zuckerberg discussed Internet.org, his relationship with Google, and Facebook’s development of drones and lasers.

Zuckerberg says that Facebook will probably “lose a bunch of money” on Internet.org and he doesn’t have a “better idea” of when it will become profitable. On whether he’ll reach his goal of connecting 1 billion more people by 2020, he said, “We’ll see. I think so.”

Zuckerberg said he talks “to a number of folks” at Google and is open to working with them on connectivity efforts: “I’d love to work with Google. They are a great search product.” On Google’s Android, Zuckerberg said, “It’s something that is certainly a little bit stressful.”

On whether Internet.org could help Facebook get back into China, he said, “that’s not something that we are focused on right now.”

On drone and laser development, he confirmed that Facebook is “going to be testing some in the near future.”

Livestream the episode at 8:30 pm ET/PT here: http://www.bloomberg.com/live

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Highlights:

Mark Zuckerberg on his vision for Internet.org:

“When people are connected, we can just do some great things. They have the opportunity to get access to jobs, education, health, communications. We have the opportunity to bring the people we care about closer to us. It really makes a big difference. The Internet is how we connect to the modern world, but today, unfortunately, only a little more than a third of people have access to the Internet at all. It’s about 2.7 billion people, and that means two-thirds of people don’t have any access to the Internet. So that seems really off to me.”

“There are all these studies that show that in developing countries, more than 20 percent of GDP growth is driven by the Internet. There have been studies that show if we connected a billion more people to the Internet, 100 million more jobs would be created, and more than that would be lifted out of poverty. So there is just this deep belief here at Facebook that technology needs to serve everyone. Connectivity just can’t be a privilege for people in the richest countries. We believe that connecting everyone in the world is one of the great challenges of our generation, and that’s why we are happy to play whatever small part in that that we can.”

Mark Zuckerberg on whether he thinks he’ll get to a billion people by 2020:

“We’ll see. I think so.”

Mark Zuckerberg on whether he has a better sense of when Internet.org will become profitable:

“No, I don’t have a better idea. The reality is just that a lot people can’t afford to pay for data access in some of these areas; then they probably aren’t ad markets, and it’s probably not going to be a place where it’s going to be particularly profitable in the near term. In fact, we’ll probably lose a bunch of money—just because supporting Facebook as a service, and storing the photos and content that people want to share, costs money. We probably won’t offset it by making much. But there’s this mission belief that connecting the world is really important, and that is something that we want to do. That is why Facebook is here on this planet.”

“And then there is this longer-term belief that this is going to be good for these countries if people have access to these tools, and over time, if you do good things, then some of that comes back to you. But you just have to be patient, and you can’t always know what the plan is going to be upfront.”

Mark Zuckerberg on believing that connectivity is a human right and why he wouldn’t just give access to the complete Internet instead of a few apps:

“Yeah, it’s a good question. So it comes down to the economics of how this works. It turns out that most of the Internet consumed is rich media, especially videos. So if you look at things like text, text-message services like search or Wikipedia, or basic financial or health information, can be delivered relatively cheaply and can consume less than 1 percent of the overall infrastructure. So if you are thinking about building something that operators can offer for free, it needs to be pretty cheap for them to do. And we’ve basically figured out a series of services that people can offer, and it actually ends up being profitable for the operators. The model that we consider this to be most similar to is 911 in the U.S. So even if you haven’t paid for a phone plan, you can always dial 911, and if there is a crime or a health emergency or a fire, you get basic help, and we think there should be an equivalent of this for the Internet as well—where even if you haven’t paid for a data plan, you can get access to basic health information or education or job tools or basic communication tools, and it will vary, country by country.”

Mark Zuckerberg on advertising executives who are excited to advertise on Internet.org and how that could benefit users:

“I’m not sure it’s a big part of the solution in the near term, to be honest. What we need to do is work out a model with operators and governments and local partners that is profitable for them so we can continue growing the Internet. What we have found in some of these early countries that we have worked in—Indonesia, the Philippines, Zambia, Kenya—is you offer a little bit of the Internet free, and more people start using data, and more people can access the Internet and access these tools, but also more people start paying for data once they understand what they would use the Internet for. The people understand why they would want to pay for data, and these operators end up making more money, and it ends up being more profitable, and it ends up taking that money and reinvesting that in better Internet and infrastructure for everyone in their country. So that ends up being very important, and a lot of what we have focused on for the past couple of years is just: How do you build a model that is sustainable for everyone and delivers free Internet to people?”

“Originally, we thought that maybe working with other kinds of partners would be important, but at this point, we think we have a sustainable model that is working in multiple countries now, and there’s a lot of momentum and a lot of countries coming online now, and a lot of other countries are coming to us to roll out the Internet.org model. So I expect to see a lot more over the next year.”

Mark Zuckerberg on whether

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