Android Lollipop vs. iOS 8

58
Android Lollipop vs. iOS 8
Freeimages9 / Pixabay

Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOGL) (NASDAQ:GOOG) has announced its latest version of the Android operating system, which is codenamed Android Lollipop. Many outlets are also referring to this piece of software as Android L, although Google’s official name is Lollipop.

This latest version of the hugely popular operating system has been unveiled to coincide with the announcement of the Google Nexus 6 phablet. This new release from Google is intended to compete directly with the iPhone 6 Plus.

Seth Klarman Describes His Approach In Rare Harvard Interview

Seth KlarmanIn a rare interview with Harvard Business School that was published online earlier this month, (it has since been taken down) value investor Seth Klarman spoke at length about his investment process, philosophy and the changes value investors have had to overcome during the past decade. Klarman’s hedge fund, the Boston-based Baupost has one of Read More

By the same token, Android will always be up against iOS 8 as its major rival, as the Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) operating system is the only significant competitor to be extremely popular Android platform. So how will this new Android L version compare with the recently released iOS 8? Here is a rundown of features included in the two operating systems.

Google Android Lollipop: Notifications System

The Android L release improves notification within the software. This ensures that notifications can be accessed via the lockscreen, and automatically ordered in priority. Furthermore, it is possible to swipe away notifications, or double tap to open the relevant app. This could be very much viewed as a response to iOS 8, as the Apple operating system included a significantly enhanced notification system. The Apple operating system is notable in this regard for being particularly customizable, and it certainly compares favorably with Android.

Lockscreen features

The Android L release will also include a new lockscreen which will display notifications for users. This will also enable a variety of different swipes to either unlock, or launch dialler and camera features. Apple has also improved functionality related to the iPhone 6 lockscreen in iOS 8, and the system is now more user-friendly with iTunes Radio in particular.

Multi-tasking functions

Google has also attempted to improve multitasking in Android L, and this will be a welcome addition among consumers given the increasing demand for multitasking mobile devices. It has already been suggested that the next wave of Apple tablets will be considerably more flexible than previous iterations in the series.

Android Lollipop will apparently show a separate card for each open tab in a device, while open applications in the software are displayed on a user interface which resembles a carousel. Each can be swiped off to either side of the device to close them, as in previous versions of software.

Split-screen multitasking has been built into iOS 8, and as mentioned previously this is expected to be utilized in the forthcoming iPod tablet range. Apple has been very much ahead of the game in this department, but Android looks to deliver some interesting features with its L release nevertheless.

Android Lollipop vs. iOS 8

Notification bar

The notification bar in Android Lollipop has been changed quite significantly. Although it effectively works in a similar way to previous additions, its new layout and colour scheme is strikingly different. Additionally, new features have been included related to Chromecast. The notification centre in iOS 8 has again been lauded for its customisation options. It will be interesting to see how Android L compares to the Apple software.

Security

This is one area in which Android has noticeably lagged behind iOS. Perhaps it is not a fair comparison, as Android is fitted in so many devices that hackers and virus creators simply have far more commercial reason to target Android. Nevertheless, the Google operating system is responsible for 97 percent of the world’s mobile malware, according to recent research, so the onus is certainly on Android L to address this situation.

Google has targeted this issue in announcements related to Android, and a new feature will enable users to unlock their smartphone when in close enough physical proximity to a device such as an Android Wear smartwatch. However, Apple’s lead in this department is simply unquestionable, and the chances of Google significantly narrowing the gap in the immediate future are in practical terms zero.

Battery life

This is a major strength of the Android system, certainly in comparison to Apple devices. The iPhone in particular has been associated with a pretty poor battery life over the years, and although Apple has attempted to improve this in iOS 8, the iPhone 6 still doesn’t really deliver anything outstanding in this department. By contrast, Google has added a dedicated battery saver mode to Android Lollipop, which will deliver up to 90 minutes of extra use per charge. It seems likely that those desiring longer battery life will continue to be better served by Android.

Performance

According to reports, Android L did not outperform Android KitKat in speed tests. The same has been suggested with regard to the comparison between iOS 8 and iOS 7.

Android TV

Finally, Android L comes complete with a new product which was not predicted by analysts – Nexus Player. As a result of this, Android TV is integrated into Lollipop providing a great deal of entertainment functionality. iOS 8 already includes Apple TV, which offers extremely similar features to Nexus Player, but is of course more established.

Updated on

No posts to display

58 COMMENTS

  1. NOTE: I am not trying to offend you.
    actually… the ios 8 has CRASHED many phones and the iphone 6 was a pretty big failure. I am not saying that apple STINKS, but I am just saying that very recently they haven’t been doing so good…
    Also, the ipad air 2 was not so good either, since android still dominates in the tablet industry.

  2. @J242: Thank you for your response. Once again, I have no problem with your preference for Apple’s Walled Garden approach, only with what I consider the oversimplified and highly misleading characterization of iOS as secure and Android as insecure.

    From what you describe, I understand that there are no safeguards in iOS itself as there are in Android — other than the fact that Apple prevents you from installing apps from other sources than their own App Store. So this oft professed security of iOS relies entirely on the human certification of apps in the App Store, not on any protections in the actual OS. A lot depends on that human certification, then, to be flawless, which explains why they spend so much time on it. I can understand that.

    And no, of course Apple doesn’t support jailbroken phones, I think we’re all aware of that. Google doesn’t support rooted phones either. But as you know, Android users have the option to install apps from other sources, even without rooting, if they deliberately disable the protections against this (and accept the warnings). But such apps are still monitored for malicious behavior (on the phone) regardless of where they come from.

    Obviously, the freedom offered by Android comes with the responsibility to practice a modicum of common sense. And it is true that some users don’t possess this and would be better off in a Walled Garden.

    To me this is no different from how I use my laptop or desktop computer: If Microsoft (or Apple in the case of Macs) got the idea of restricting me to only install software from their respective App Stores (where they get a 30% cut) their OS would be useless to me. I will install the necessary apps to get my work done. It is up to me to practice common sense in choosing what I install and not to disregard warnings and basic safeguards. Android is better in this regard than both Windows, MacOS and (as I now understand) iOS, in that the OS itself warns me about the Permissions required by an app before installing it, and it continuously monitors the behavior of the app through Verify Apps (as does Windows — even if less thoroughly than some 3rd party AV products.)

    Thank you again for answering those questions about iOS.

  3. Hey Ponta, i can understand why you feel this way about Android cos it’s exactly this is how i felt when i came out of Nokia wanting a truly “smart” phone, at that point of time, Android was still in it’s infant stage and i heard good things about iPhone all over, i mean if you hear so much it has to be good right? Then i get the “luck” of meeting someone very into Apple and i thought to myself maybe he could tell me more in depth. Boy was it wrong, from information i wanted, the session become much like preaching and getting me into a cult and that was what got me to Android lol. But i must say there are bad eggs on both side of the camp. Once i stepped into a tech forum on the Apple section by mistake and asked about a whatsapp issue and people there were pretty rude.

    I do admit Android was bad at the beginning even though it could do more than IOS but every year the improvement to performance and features has been great (although some are attributed to better hardware). I don’t own an iPhone but i do have an iPod Touch 5th and i still couldn’t see what’s the fuss on IOS is about cos i could do more on an Android than on IOS (perhaps cos i try to squeeze every little features that Android provide as much as i can). I know why people like IOS, cos it’s simple and you don’t have to worry too much about this and that and build quality is excellent.

  4. Apple scans the submitted packages during the ingestion phase which points out all APIs used and “Capabilities” of the app which are then rolled into the manual test plan. Along with metadata keyword searches, hard-coded text, etc. The reason this is overall quite secure is because Apple has control over the APIs, the ad networks that are used and more. If someone is getting creative with their SDK, it’s pretty quickly flagged then confirmed via manual testing.

    You mentioned side-loaded apps. That is one huge difference between iOS and Android in that Apple does not support jailbroken phones. If you side-load a malicious app to your device, you’re SOL because you’ve just violated the EULA for the equipment and are operating in an unsupported manner.

    Part of the reason Google is so easy to attack is it’s more “open” nature. ISVs aren’t tied into one ad system or one sole specific method for implementing functions. By having so many 3rd party sources to install apps from only makes it easier for apps malicious apps to spread. From what I’ve been seeing. The majority of Google Play infections have been caused by seemingly benign apps allowing backdoor access, sending SMS messages to pay-to-dial numbers, or snagging PII from the user’s device. Lately it seems that most of these cases don’t “activate” until several days after the initial install and because of that, they weren’t picked up by Google’s supposedly advanced ingestion software. The most heinous recent example of this would be the BadNews debacle that infected up to 2 millions users via a fake ad network. That’s a pretty major breach of security. It makes it difficult to take Google seriously when every other month it “seems like” they uncover yet another major security breach that has already worked it’s way onto countless users’ devices. You don’t hear of anyone else having nearly the volume of problems and most times it comes down to the open approach they’ve (Google) taken whereas the walled garden approach Apple and WP have taken is far less prone to security breaches. Yes, they still have them, but nowhere near as often or as egregious and the extra security doesn’t seem to be hurting Apple’s app availability one bit either. When I go to Google Play, it’s page after page of junk apps. Filtering through it seems absurd and not unlike WP’s app store. That’s just my personal take away only, nothing to back it up (catalog quality) of course.

  5. I @J242: am not denying that Apple’s human certification of every app submission will catch some apps that might slip by Google’s scanner (called “Bouncer”).

    Although, when it comes to automatic scanning (which I am sure Apple must be doing as well) I generally have more confidence in Google’s ability to scan for malicious behavior in an Android app: Both because Google is way ahead when it comes to A.I. and because Android apps are submitted as bytecode, while I understand iOS apps are submitted as binaries, which must be harder to analyze for malicious intent. (Please correct me if I am wrong here and you also submit source code to Apple for review. And yes, I am fully aware of the other pros/cons of machine code vs bytecode, that’s not the topic.)

    So I do admit that Play Store is more likely to have apps containing profanity (your example) and even some malicious apps. Yet, almost all real world Android infections affect users who install from seedy Chinese and Russian app stores, not from Google Play Store. And as I pointed out, Android itself and Google Play Services provide other safeguards, scanning apps from Play Store as well as from other sources. And these are kept updated directly from Google all the way back to Android 2.3. That is why you mostly find stories about the “existence” of Android malware (promoted by providers of security products) and few reports of actual users being infected. Again, the story I linked in other comments here contains the statistics to back this up.

    The question I asked you, and which you did not answer, is which safeguards exist in iOS itself in case a malicious app should manage to get past the Apple employee reviewing it for the App Store? Or if an app is sideloaded on a jailbroken iPhone? I don’t know if any such safeguards exist in iOS or they rely entirely on that human reviewer to catch it before entering the App Store. Please let me know if you have the answer.

    And the downside to Apple’s approach (as I also pointed out) is that many perfectly useful apps get rejected because they don’t align with Apple’s interests (say, compete with a current or future Apple product or service). Google’s philosophy is to let the hundreds of millions of Play Store users decide if an app is “worthy” as long as it doesn’t contain anything malicious.

    Listen, I get it that you prefer Apple’s Walled Garden approach. That is perfectly OK, there are indeed some benefits to that. Fortunately there’s a lid for every pot, we don’t all have to have the same preferences and priorities.

    My point is that people need honest information to make their own decisions. And the propaganda machine that keeps perpetuating the myth that “Apple is secure and Android is insecure” is doing the world a disfavor. Even Apple loyalists should want a thriving market of competing platforms and vendors: If Apple were the sole supplier of smartphones (which I think they feel is their birthright) you’d be paying $2,500 for an iPhone instead of “only” $750, and we’d still have 3.4 inch screens and no multitasking, notifications, 3rd party keyboards, NFC or other modern features. Competition is a wonderful thing!

  6. Yeah, so I can’t think of “massively going to die without features,” but there are a couple threads of hardware ideas, for instance you have things like the galaxy note series with built in digitizers that work with a hardware stylus.

    Nexus tablets tend to be the solid tablet builds, and there are a variety of lines that manufacturers have for varied experiences.

    Other more specific features:

    Some tablets have ways to use cables to mirror a display to a TV (like mine has a mini-hdmi port).

    Some have various additional sensors, like the Moto X series has for contextual information.

    There are various arrays of displays (screens I mean, in terms of resolution and type – as in AMOLED or LCD), speaker arrangements, SD card/other ports/NFC/Wireless Charging/wireless display abilities, and chip sets available in terms of hardware.

    You can also have creative software features (sometimes gimmicks like I said before). You can have things like the recent LG phones that have “knock on” screens that detect when you tap the screen to turn it on (which other manufacturer’s have also started adding).

    At the end of the day it can depend heavily on the way a manufacturer puts it together, so device reviews can be very important. I personally have been using an NVIDIA Shield Tablet, which also uses the GPU to make a capacitive stylus with a narrow tip to mimic an active (digitizer) stylus. It also has some video-gaming features that I personally don’t use, but are supposed to be pretty solid features. It has some qwerks still being worked out for software, but does what I need it to (and theyre rolling out updates for stuff fairly quickly).

    Hope that helps!

  7. What an incredible source of misinformation this article is… I do hope those interested in switching to Android (should the platform appeal to them) pays zero heed to this article. I’ve owned more iPhones than Android phones, and I’m still calling this what it is: Apple propaganda.

  8. This is a very well-informed reply to a very ill-informed, alarmist commentary. Well done, Dannemand. If every iOS user on Earth read this reply, the Android community would be a lot less frustrated with the ignorance we often have to deal with.

    I don’t care who makes my phone or my operating system – I’ve bought iPhones, and I’ve bought Android phones – but when someone does something right, it’s good to reward them. Android deserves to be rewarded for making such an open, easily modded, yet still very secure, operating system. This concept is important for many of us, and it is the cornerstone to much of the Android fandom.

    Android is great because it’s so incredibly malleable and changeable. Android is built to accept, and even accommodate change – this is a stark difference compared to Apple’s strategy. Apple actively combats forces of change on their operating system. iPhones are supposed to be uniform, which leads to elegance and simplicity, but it has a drawback for those looking to mold their device to perfectly fit their visual preferences, workflows and interests. Some think that’s important, others do not.

    For those out there that find these points important, we want them to know this platform is safe, and worthy of their investment. For that reason, I applaud this sensible, informed reply in the midst of the nonsense being slung around in this article, and this thread.

  9. You never hear of Android users suffering infections or malware? Huh, I heard a lot of complaints from users regarding Mobogenie and Cleanmaster this year alone. As for users disregarding an app’s capabilities, the majority of people out there don’t know the difference between toast and push notifications so it doesn’t make any difference if they are told the app does something they don’t understand in the first place.

  10. Listen idiot, Apple employs people who test app submissions. So does Microsoft. I know employees on both teams! What the hell is wrong with you that you can’t get that through your thick skull?! Are you SO anti-Apple that you’ve let your own bias and ignorance craft your reality and are trying to argue the point that is based solely on your own delusions?

    http://www.businessinsider.com/heres-why-it-really-sucks-to-be-an-app-reviewer-for-apple-2012-7

    DO you REALLY think Apple has some incredible image analyzing tool that goes through every image in an app and pass/fails anything that might contain nudity? Of course not. They have employees reviewing EVERY app that is submitted, that’s why it can take up to two weeks to get an app approved! Stop BS’ing, you don’t have a damned clue what you’re talking about.

    “How did you attain the amazing, unique qualifications to be able to create mobile applications? What, are there 2 or 3 people in all of programming history who have attained this?”

    No, what I’m saying is that you simply don’t develop or you would know the reality of the individual markets. It’s incredibly easy to develop for mobile. Considering it’s so easy to develop for these platforms makes it that much more offensive for you to be speaking out of your ass on a topic that would be VERY easy to actually educate yourself on.

  11. You need to check your facts. And you won’t get them from general news sites, such as this. Not because they’re all paid by Apple (I don’t believe that is the case) but because they are usually written by people who only have experience from their own iPhones. Beyond that, they just repeat the same misinformation they’ve read on other sites.

    Try this story for starters: http://qz.com/131436/contrary-to-what-youve-heard-android-is-almost-impenetrable-to-malware/

    Earth is actually round, not flat. Despite what it appears, and despite what many “experts” claim.

  12. So you’re saying you mistake arbitrary, automated surface-level scans for actual analysis. Noted. How many app submissions will it take you to understand this better? And you somehow don’t realize that projections of your insecurities and needs speaks only about you? How did you attain the amazing, unique qualifications to be able to create mobile applications? What, are there 2 or 3 people in all of programming history who have attained this? Is it difficult to type with a sore shoulder (from reaching around and patting yourself on the back all day)?

  13. “Their intentionally introduced delay is nothing more than a 1 minute executable scan just like the other two platforms, plus a week of sitting around. ”

    Windows Phone has indeed moved from a pre-publish process to a post-publish process in order to increase the number of apps available on their store. Android NEVER had any actual constraints. It’s the wild west over there as they don’t even audit keywords to detect potential ACA infringements. WP has a slightly more balanced approach where keywords are flagged for immediate review at submission and then audits are conducted post-publish for certain triggers like download count, reviews comments, ratings, etc…

    Again, you really do not know what you are talking about and if somehow you actually do, you aren’t showing it here with this ridiculously ignorant tripe you keep vomiting out.

  14. Again, you are obviously not a developer. You have never gotten any failed cert tests from any of the 3 primary mobile marketplaces otherwise you might have something to base your wildly false beliefs on. I’ve worked on apps that were failed for iOS for profanity within the app’s content (namely a specific band’s app that contained music samples, some of which contained single instances of ‘cuss words’ in the 25 second previews we built into it) and I know first hand that their ingestion tools don’t analyze the in-app content. We had to formally challenge Apple for failing the app on the grounds that they sold the music on the iTunes store and we won the battle. To try and suggest there are not actual people reviewing apps is absurd and shows you know little about the issue at hand. There is no “snow job” as you put it. How could any app ever fail for “profanity” in it’s content if there are no keywords in the metadata or in-app triggering an automated audit? Audio clips require someone actually LISTENING to determine if there are ‘cuss words’ or similar ‘profanity’ being presented. Just like how many manga apps get failed for only linking to hentai content. It requires a human being to observe the content and make a decision to escalate it.

    Go home, develop some apps, submit them to all three marketplaces and THEN (and only then) speak about the app submission’s review process.

  15. That would be a great idea if you can find someone. The obvious android phones to compare to the new iphone are the samsung galaxy s5 and the nexus 6.

  16. One example is android users have been able to use split screen multitasking for a couple years now. This article blatantly ignores this and says that apple is ahead of the curve because it just received this feature. Also benchmark test have shown that android L might not surpass IOS 8 but is just as good, in speed and stability and security. Both operating systems are great and have pros and cons. Android is far more customization but apple has plenty of pros too. I own both types of devises. I can understand android users aggravation with the media being biased towards apple most of the time and skewing information.

  17. To understand how tasty a slice of pizza down the block is versus a slice at Pizza Hut or Papa John’s, you need someone to explain the variables that differentiates one from the other.

  18. They said the notification center in iOS is customizable, not the iOS itself. If you have an iPhone you’ll see that it’s true.

  19. I agree again – that the Apple marketing department’s snow job has fooled you. Their intentionally introduced delay is nothing more than a 1 minute executable scan just like the other two platforms, plus a week of sitting around. You fell for it.

  20. Who writes this stuff? A member of staff at Apple? Why is everything compared to iPhone or listed as a ‘response to Apple’ blah blah? Android is not secure? Absolute rubbish. This site needs new writing staff!

  21. You have obviously never developed for all three mobile markets before. Android has only post-process certification based on user complaints. Windows Phone has a mix of pre and post publish certification but iOS tests EVERY app submitted and can often take up to a week to get an app published because they test it for technical, metadata and content. Apple and Windows Phone both have living, breathing people reviewing the technical capabilities, metadata and content of the apps submitted for their stores. How do you not know that? Oh yeah, you aren’t a developer. Don’t speak on what you don’t know.

  22. Speaking of visceral responses… I think I’ve seen more hateful and vitriolic responses from the Apple side. But let that be now.

    Apps on Google Play Store are accepted if they are clean from malicious behavior using Google’s (quite extensive) heuristic scanning. But there are are no Google bureaucrats deciding whether a given app is “worthy” or whether it aligns with Google’s interests. And indeed, that does allow some nonsensical apps in there.

    As for the hypothetical app you describe, users are warned about its Permissions before installing it, including that it wants to access contacts and send SMS messages. And Verify Apps scans for malicious behavior on apps from Play Store as well from other sources (again, unless the user DELIBERATELY disables it).

    So there are several layers of protection even if an app gets onto Play Store. If you google the story I mentioned, you can read more about this.

    I don’t know which protections exist in iOS itself if a malicious app should manage to get past the Apple employee vetting it for the App Store. Or if an app is sideloaded onto a jailbroken iPhone. Can you tell me that?

    The key here is that your never hear of any actual Android users having suffered infections, since those occur almost entirely among users downloading apps from less than savory Chinese and Russian app stores — which requires disabling safeguards AND scanning features in the Android OS itself, and ignoring Permissions warnings displayed prior to installation.

    Obviously there is a philosophic difference between an open ecosystem such as Google Play Store, and a strictly walled ecosystem that only permits apps which an Apple employee deems “worthy” and which are found to align with Apple’s interests. I’ve seen several stories about Developers having their perfectly useful apps booted from (or denied into) App Store because they somehow competed with Apple interests.

    It is for each user to decide whether they value the vastly higher flexibility of an open OS and ecosystem (but one with many safeguards and several layers of protection in the OS) or they prefer the restrictions of a tightly walled ecosystem. In making that decision, users deserve honest information about REAL risks (how likely is a responsible user from getting infected), not these hypothetical and vastly inflated claims that are being repeated by some in the Apple community.

  23. I agree completely – that you do not have the slightest idea what you are talking about. iOS apps are no more “certified” than Android apps. Repeating the nonsense Apple marketing spews out just takes up space here.

  24. Yes, this is what I’m looking for, thanks. I’d love to know what hardware in particular stands out. What am I missing that I may not know about?

    Definitely the customization is a very big plus point on Android; I have jailbroken a few times because I want the icon placement and movement to be more reasonable (I hate when Apple decides what’s best for you), but jailbreaking is getting harder and harder to maintain nowadays.

    As you say, a lot of it is personal preference. I guess I need enough of a reason to make the jump, considering the rather long-term commitment required for this. It’s hard to leave what you are familiar with and take a leap into the unknown, though.

    Maybe I should find a friend with Android who does not depend on the device as a phone (as is the case with me) and see if we can arrange a one or two-week swap…

  25. I’m just trying to get a reliable, detailed, personal account of someone who enjoys the OS and why. You can’t get that much from the reviews, they remain technical and detached, and usually speak to people who are already familiar with the systems. I try to get them from regular folk in discussions–but all I tend to get is pithy, hateful dismissals. You know, people who would respond to a sincere request with an insult. Not that you would know anyone like that. But thanks for the input, it’s valuable.

  26. “The truth here is that Android is incredibly secure, and has several layers of protection which users must DELIBERATELY disable, accepting clearly displayed warnings when doing so, in order for any such malware to infect a device.”

    Completely, absolutely, incredibly wrong for one major reason. There is no certification of apps on Google Play. A dev could submit an app that only has 2 functions, 1 to display an animated image and 2 to send a link to itself to every contact in a user’s address book and it would get published within a matter of hours. Even if only 5 people installed it, that would still be a major breach of trust that Google has allowed to happen. The ingestion process they use for apps is pretty clear and it details all of the capabilities the app has (access to PII, Push Notifications, Location Services, etc, etc, etc) but they don’t do anything about it unless you, their testing ‘herd’ complain about it. Then, if enough of you complain about it, MAYBE they’ll take it down.

    Sorry, but that’s not reassuring in any way and Google allows it to keep happening because they would rather treat their customers as unpaid interns than look out for them and ensure they have a good experience. Even Windows Phone doesn’t do that and look at how small their market share is! Why do you defend a product that treats you like a lab rat? Is that a fair compromise for getting shiny tech at bargain bin prices? You get what you pay for I guess.

  27. (This is my 3rd posting of this reply, the moderator keeps deleting it. I am now trying to post it again, but without linking to an another article. I cannot imagine it is being deleted simply because it points out flaws in the article.)

    @Ponta Vedra, your interest in facts is admirable, though it is a bit much to ask that commenters spend time writing a rebuttal. After all, the author of this article is the one who pretends to be an expert on both platforms by publishing a comparison (and presumably being paid to do so).

    Personally I don’t have first hand experience with iPhones, as some commenters here do. And I don’t pretend to. But I DO have enough Android experience and knowledge to recognize when someone does NOT have such experience.

    In my previous comment I mentioned one point in this article, which to me is a dead giveaway, namely the fact that the author perpetuates the myth of “the Google operating system is responsible for 97 percent of the world’s mobile malware”.

    The truth here is that Android is incredibly secure, and has several layers of protection which users must DELIBERATELY disable, accepting clearly displayed warnings when doing so, in order for any such malware to infect a device. Even after the protection against apps from untrusted sources has been disabled, there is a built-in scanner (Verify Apps) which detects malicious behavior. This scanner is automatically updated as part of Google Play Services on all Android versions back to 2.3 (from 2010). Again, unless the user DELIBERATELY disables it.

    Most of the thousands of stories about Android malware originate from companies who sell security software and who “discover” techniques to attack Android and/or malware with which to do so — but in almost all cases it requires knowingly disabling all safeguards of the OS. And that is why hardly ANY of these malware stories talk about actual infections having taken place, only about the theoretical possibility of such infections.

    This information (of which I only scratched the surface) is available in lots of places. Try googling “contrary to what you’ve heard, android is almost impenetrable to malware” (I couldn’t link it here).

    None of this quite fits the myth about Android fragmentation and lack of security. Yet most Android users know it, and they roll their eyes when they see yet another writer regurgitating that myth.

    Strangely, on the subject of security, this story didn’t mention full-device encryption, a feature which has Android has had since 2011, and which is now all over the news after Apple included it in iOS 8.

    I don’t mean for this to be the rebuttal of the author’s comparison points that you asked for. I don’t know iOS so I cannot give you that. I merely point it out as a sign that here is yet another author writing stories about Android who doesn’t know much about it. Dozens of stories like that are posted daily. Hundreds if you include blog posts. These authors should stick to writing what they know about: Their iPhones.

    And when you see cynical comments from Android users, it is because they (like I) get a wee bit tired of this huge propaganda machine pumping out stories to stroke the pleasure centers of Apple loyalists by spreading false information about Android.

  28. The problem is this same kind of visceral response goes both ways, it’s just leaning one way in this article due to an overtly Apple biased tone. No offense but the onus shouldn’t be on the comment section to point out flaws in what should be a professionally written article, especially at the expense of their own time, but what the hay, if you have a general want for explanations.

    1) The Notification System and Bar: “The notification centre in iOS 8 has again been lauded for its customization options” This is an interesting quote for multiple reasons. The idea that iOS is being lauded for customization seems off, and more importantly the idea that it is considered superior to Android in notifications in any way is odd. Android had notifications first and while Apple implemented and has done some good work with their system, even many Apple supporters will admit that android still has it better. The idea that android is playing catch up with iOS in notifications seems way off base, and the author fails to point out where it wins, and simply makes vague claims.

    2) Multi Tasking: “Apple has been very much ahead of the game in this department” This statement is laughable, and no offense to Apple, but they have been decried for years by android users due to iOS’s complete lack of any actual multi tasking ability. The split screen features mentioned don’t exist on any iOS device, but can be found on a number of Android devices already (not baked into the OS, but usable through certain manufacture skins or apps). This is certainly a department in which Android in not at all playing catch up.

    3) Security: “The Google operating system is responsible for 97 percent of the world’s mobile malware” and “the chances of Google significantly narrowing the gap in the immediate future are in practical terms zero” These quotes have a couple of problems. The number itself has been called into question, it ignores the fact that malware is for the most part a non issue on apps purchased through official channels, it ignores that most mobile malware doesn’t even work, if ignores the fact that major security holes have been found in iOS, and that they simply haven’t been exploited often. The big issue though is it assumes android itself is the point of insecurity, instead of pointing out that the nature of an open OS where you can install things through non official channels necessarily opens up the platform to security issues (while also making it more useful for those who use the openness for positive aspects), etc. The claim that Android is simply less secure then iOS is a huge oversimplification.

    4) Performance: There are a number of features in Android L that should boost performance, but until we see the final build it’s hard to test this. Saying that performance is stagnant based on test using a preview version filled with debugging code, running apps that haven’t been optimized (or are simply incompatible with ART) etc doesn’t make sense. Most of the test likely referenced were done with the first public beta of Android L, with all it’s bugs intact. Google claims that we should see a 2-3X improvement in speed for code running on ART on the final version of L, and while we will have to wait to see if this pans out, to just assume that performance will fail to improve based on a couple peoples experience with an early beta is not wise.

    5 Android TV: “but is of course more established” This is actually one of the most grievous offenses. The Apple TV is a pure streaming box, and while yes, it is more established, in most reviews it loses out in functionality when compared to a roku box. The Nexus Player is a far more powerful device, is compatible with a special game controller (maybe others), should hopefully be able to do much more then stream content given it’s specs, includes voice commands, etc. Attempting to give the nod to iOS for Apple TV based solely on it being more “established” is the epitome of bias, as the article ignores a slew of features available on the Nexus Player that are certainly not found on Apple TV, and simply does a hand wave by saying “They offer extremely similar features”. By that logic every smartphone is near equal as the all offer similar features. Now the device could be terrible, and we have no way of knowing if it will work out, but at least mention the new features it brings to the game.

    And there you go. I’m not an Apple hater, I actually own and enjoy some Apple products, but articles like this can be quite annoying.

  29. (My post posting of this didn’t show up. I apologize if this becomes a duplicate).

    @Ponta Vedra, your interest in facts is admirable, though it is a bit much to ask that commenters spend time writing a rebuttal. After all, the author of this article is the one who pretends to be an expert on both platforms by publishing a comparison (and presumably being paid to do so).

    Personally I don’t have first hand experience with iPhones, as some commenters here do. And I don’t pretend to. But I DO have enough Android experience and knowledge to recognize when someone is merely faking it.

    In my previous comment I mentioned one point in this article, which to me is a dead giveaway, namely the fact that the author perpetuates the myth of “the Google operating system is responsible for 97 percent of the world’s mobile malware”.

    The truth here is that Android is incredibly secure, and has several layers of protection which users must DELIBERATELY disable, accepting clearly displayed warnings when doing so, in order for any such malware to infect a device. Even after the protection against apps from untrusted sources has been disabled, there is a built-in scanner (Verify Apps) which detects malicious behavior. This scanner is automatically updated as part of Google Play Services on all Android versions back to 2.3 (from 2010). Again, unless the user DELIBERATELY disables it.

    Most of the thousands of stories about Android malware originate from companies who sell security software and who “discover” techniques to attack Android and/or malware with which to do so — but in almost all cases it requires knowingly disabling all safeguards of the OS. And that is why hardly ANY of these malware stories talk about actual infections having taken place, only about the theoretical possibility of such infections.

    This information (of which I only scratched the surface) is available in lots of places, such as this: http://qz.com/131436/contrary-to-what-youve-heard-android-is-almost-impenetrable-to-malware/

    None of this quite fits the myth about Android fragmentation and lack of security. Yet most Android users know it, and they roll their eyes when they see yet another writer regurgitating that myth.

    Strangely, on the subject of security, this author didn’t mention full-device encryption, a feature which has Android has had since 2011, and which is now all over the news after Apple included it in iOS 8.

    I don’t mean for this to be the rebuttal of the author’s comparison points that you asked for. I don’t know iOS so I cannot give you that. I merely point it out as a sign that here is yet another author writing stories about Android who doesn’t know much about it. Dozens of stories like that are posted daily. Hundreds if you include blog posts. These authors should stick to writing what they know about: Their iPhones.

    And when you see cynical comments from Android users, it is because they (like I) get a wee bit tired of this huge propaganda machine pumping out stories to stroke the pleasure centers of Apple loyalists by spreading false information about Android.

  30. @Ponta Vedra, your interest in facts is admirable, though it is a bit much to ask that commenters spend time writing a rebuttal. After all, the author of this article is the one who pretends to be an expert on both platforms by publishing a comparison (and presumably being paid to do so).

    Personally I don’t have first hand experience with iPhones, as some commenters here do. And I don’t pretend to. But I DO have enough Android experience and knowledge to recognize when someone is merely faking it.

    In my previous comment I mentioned one point in this article, which to me is a dead giveaway, namely the fact that the author perpetuates the myth of “the Google operating system is responsible for 97 percent of the world’s mobile malware”.

    The truth here is that Android is incredibly secure, and has several layers of protection which users must DELIBERATELY disable, accepting clearly displayed warnings when doing so, in order for any such malware to infect a device. Even after the protection against apps from untrusted sources has been disabled, there is a built-in scanner (Verify Apps) which detects malicious behavior. This scanner is automatically updated as part of Google Play Services on all Android versions back to 2.3 (from 2010). Again, unless the user DELIBERATELY disables it.

    Most of the thousands of stories about Android malware originate from companies who sell security software and who “discover” techniques to attack Android and/or malware with which to do so — but in almost all cases it requires knowingly disabling all safeguards of the OS. And that is why hardly ANY of these malware stories talk about actual infections having taken place, only about the theoretical possibility of such infections.

    This information (of which I only scratched the surface) is available in lots of places, such as this: http://qz.com/131436/contrary-to-what-youve-heard-android-is-almost-impenetrable-to-malware/

    None of this quite fits the myth about Android fragmentation and lack of security. Yet most Android users know it, and they roll their eyes when they see yet another writer regurgitating that myth.

    Strangely, on the subject of security, this author didn’t mention full-device encryption, a feature which has Android has had since 2011, and which is now all over the news after Apple included it in iOS 8.

    I don’t mean for this to be the rebuttal of the author’s comparison points that you asked for. I don’t know iOS so I cannot give you that. I merely point it out as a sign that here is yet another author writing stories about Android who doesn’t know much about it. Dozens of stories like that are posted daily. Hundreds if you include blog posts. These authors should stick to writing what they know about: Their iPhones.

    And when you see cynical comments from Android users, it is because they (like I) get a wee bit tired of this huge propaganda machine pumping out stories to stroke the pleasure centers of Apple loyalists by spreading false information about Android.

    And now I spent half an hour writing this comment…

  31. Honestly it comes down to personal preference. As some articles point out, they are becoming more similar over time. The difference is somewhat similar to Mac vs PC in that you have an optimized os for particular hardware, while android is made for a wider variety of hardware. Now these are all generalizations, but in general, these are some things I have seen.

    With android you have the option for more customization and tweaks ( ie sidebar app drawers, and multitasking apps like Switchr), as well as launchers /icon tweaks to use. You can also change lock screens, etc. You do have a younger ecosystem for apps, however the differences over time have become smaller.

    iOS gives you some extra stability (again degree depends on the android device you compare to, things like the Nexus line tend to be comparably stable). It as an os is reputed for smoothness, though L is bridging some of those gaps.

    At the end of the day I enjoy android for the flexibility in hardware, as well as the way I can tend to make it my own and work how I want. Some brands offer features (and sometimes numerous gimmicks) like Samsung with a multiwindow mode to do things side by side. I have gotten used to, and now prefer the android button navigation method (is back button). I used to regularly use an iPod touch, however now I use and android phone and tablet, and also prefer things like the app drawer, widgets, and ability to use a file system. But for some, those aren’t pluses, and the sometimes large changes between the generations of android hardware can put people off and they prefer the consistency and “just works” feeling that they get from iOS.

    It’s personal preference, and I like the feel of android. I happen to think it is something that is constantly improving itself, and that that cycle of improvement is exciting to me.

    Anyway hope that is informative for you!

  32. This article is full of biases. Apple products are very good. But please don’t ruin android by misinforming others of what you don’t know. If you don’t own both devices(flagship devices for android and latest iphone), you are simply not eligible of writing such articles.

  33. See, this is a great example of why I get bad vibes about Android. It’s like it’s some kind of visceral response, not reasoned. You obviously don’t need “hours” to express your dissatisfaction. Five to ten minutes tops would allow covering at least half a dozen issues. Go for it.

  34. I have had iPhones since the 3G, and have been lucky to never have an unresolvable problem. Twice there were problems with the actual device, but Apple replaced them immediately with new/refurbished phones. I tend to lag a little on major upgrades to avoid early-adopter issues, which has certainly served me well with the iOS 8.0.1 disaster. But otherwise, I have had solid performance from good machines. I know people with identical-model iPhones with sucky battery life, but my own devices have all fared very well in this regard–some of it is just chance.

    I really do want to know the other side of the fence, though. Not so badly that I will make a 2-yar commitment, but rather enough so I would know if I *should* make a 2-year commitment. When I have picked up Android devices from other people, I have been unimpressed; for example, the touchscreen often seems to be less smooth and responsive than the iPhone’s. I try to do some basic functions, but easily get lost; is that a lack of intuitiveness in the Android OS, or is it just because I am only using the device for a few minutes at a time? When I first got an iPhone, it was instantly clear how to use it.

    Even if Android devices have a slightly steeper learning curve, is it worth it? And if so, why? Trust me, I am not some hard-core fan one way or the other. Though I prefer Macs over Windows, I never begrudge anyone a different choice, and have often happily steered people towards Windows if that’s where their interests run. But if I want to steer people toward Android, even if it’s not the OS for me, I would really like to know why. The last thing I want to do is get someone to buy an iPhone they do not like.

    The thing is, I need cogent arguments and meaningful descriptions, not flame-war idiocy.

  35. I had iphone 5s for 3 weeks and couldn’t takr this POS any longer. Went back to nexus 5. If you’re really think ios can even compare to Android then you’re an idiot. I don’t have hours do type the difference . Apple doesn’t even have a proper multitasking…

  36. I agree, the comments are worse than the article. They won’t give an explanation, just juvenile stabs at a platform that makes them fervently jealous for some reason. Or they’ll try to use specs as an argument that really means almost nothing relevant when comparing two different platforms. It’s sad that the majority of (or all) Apple related articles are polluted with these ignorant biases. I normally just ignore this nonsense, but sometimes I stoop to their level and call them out. I wish there was a way to flag idiotic comments, then being able to filter them out.

  37. If so, then don’t just deny, post a rebuttal on points. I am not familiar with Android, and want to get the whole story. Just seeing people mutter vague denials alongside petty flame-way epithets is not in the least bit convincing. Instead, please give a quick 2-3 sentence rundown on why each point is wrong. For example, I don’t see Apple doing any split-screen multitasking on the new iPads; it has been rumored, but it seems pretty clear Apple has punted on this feature again, while some Android devices have had it for a while.

    Talking about “CrApple” and “phanbois” and trash talk like that just makes me want to stay away from Android.

  38. Yeah, that was a pretty embarrassing piece of writing. Clearly the writer has zero first hand experience with Android and only knows what he has read on other uniformed blogs. Or maybe he really is a paid Apple shill, though not necessarily.

    His impression of Android Security is a dead giveaway, perpetuating the notion that the number of articles about Android malware (thousands) has any relation to the number devices actually infected (good luck finding any).

  39. Bought and paid for by CrApple INC. Seemed to favor Apple once again .. Where did this so called review come from ? I will ban this from my searches ,,, I will give this 1/2 a grain of salt or sand or ?

Comments are closed.