The Wisdom Of The Stoics By Henry Hazlitt

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The Wisdom Of The Stoics By Henry Hazlitt

The Wisdom of the Stoics: Selections from Seneca, Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius

Edited and with an introduction by Frances and Henry Hazlitt

The Wisdom Of The Stoics: Selections from Seneca, Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius by Frances Hazlitt

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The Stoics philosophy was founded by Zeno, a Phoenician (c, 320-c. 250 B.C.), but nothing by him has come down to us except a few fragmentary quotations. He was followed by Cleanthes, then by Chrysippus, and still later by Panaetius and Posidonus. But though Chrysippus, for example, is said to have written 705 books, practically nothing is extant by any of these philosophers except in second-hand accounts. Only three of the ancient Stoics, Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius, survive in complete books.

None of the three has ever had a large audience. The history of their reputations is curious. In the seventeenth century Seneca was certainly the best known. Then, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, he was almost completely forgotten, and popularity alternated between Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. Under the influence of Matthew Arnold, the latter became a sort of cultural “must