Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s Barnaby Martin and his research team have a unique perspective on Davos and how to address the issue of rising populism. Attack the problem strategically by addressing the most important target. From Martin’s standpoint, it is the pocket book that matters most in the battle around global populism. Use this to stop the surge – and profit from it, the ultimate relative value trade. Assuming the assessment of populism and their resulting investment analysis is correct, those reading Martin’s research might be able to oppose populism while profiting from the movement’s ascendance at the same time. If this trade thesis proves accurate, it might belong among the all time great analyst recommendations.

Populism

The behind populism is a wallet issue

As a certain segment of the global glitterati have been toiling day and more often into the night to solve the problems of the world, there is an issue getting much attention. Globalized populism is the topic of the day, talk which at night might fade away as thoughts of the average man wiping sweat from there brow might give way to the obvious EX Bar, which in Davos is a little too well known for the elite of elite. For this group, those late night invitation only parties take place along the discrete side street clubs and in the ski chalets. Last friday as this group watched the end of Davos occur the same day as the inauguration of Donald Trump.


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